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Videos from NIH

Listed here are videos from the NIH Office of the Director Vodcast YouTube Channel External Web Site Policy. Additional videos may be available from the 27 Institutes and Centers that make up NIH.

Videos from NIH: 2014

Videos from NIH: 2013

  • December 12, 2013

    Tumor Simultations Offer Insight Into Treatment Options (:38)
    New research published by Kristin Swanson, PhD, in PLOS ONE highlights the use of a biomathematical model and optimization algorithm to decrease the amount of radiation received by normal tissue and to increase its impact on brain tumors.

  • December 7, 2013

    Genetically Modified Immune Cells Attack Leukemia in Adults and Children(6:52)
    Three and a half years after beginning a clinical trial, supported by the National Institutes of Health, which demonstrated the first successful and sustained use of genetically engineered T cells to fight leukemia.

  • November 22, 2013

    Poliovirus Vaccine Trial Shows Promise For Recurrent Gliobastoma(2:55)
    In 2010 Stephanie Lipscomb was diagnosed with glioblastoma, an aggressive type of brain cancer. She underwent surgery to remove the tumor, but it returned two years later. She agreed to take part in the first phase of a research trial at Duke where a modified polio virus is injected directly into the tumor.

  • November 15, 2013

    Duke receives $62 million grant to lead network for clinical research on antibacterial resistance (1:59)
    Investigators at Duke Medicine and the University of California San Francisco have been selected to oversee a nationwide research program on antibacterial resistance.

  • November 6, 2013

    La Jolla Institute Scientist Shane Crotty Discusses Pivotal AIDS Vaccine Discovery (2:35)
    La Jolla Institute scientist Shane Crotty, Ph.D., a respected vaccine researcher and member of one of the nation's top AIDS vaccine consortiums, has pinpointed key cells that trigger a potent antibody response to HIV, the virus that causes AIDS.

  • November 6, 2013

    Long-Term Cognitive Impairment Too Common After Critical Illness (2:12)
    Patients treated in intensive care units across the globe enter their medical care with no evidence of cognitive impairment but often leave with deficits similar to those seen in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) or mild Alzheimer's disease (AD) that persists for at least a year.

  • October 22, 2013

    Dr. Cleveland - Candidate Gene Studies (1:00)
    Dr. Bo Cleveland, Associate Professor of Human Development at Penn State University discuses candidate gene studies.

  • October 22, 2013

    Dr. Cleveland - Current Project (2:50)
    Penn State University's Dr. Hobart 'Bo' Cleveland discusses his current project.

  • October 22, 2013

    Dr. Bo Cleveland: Gene by Environment (2:04)
    Penn State University's Dr. Bo Cleveland discusses his research in gene environment.

  • September 19, 2013

    NEI: Childhood Blindness (3:36)
    National Eye Institute investigator Dr. Brian Brooks provides an overview of the importance of vision research.

  • September 19, 2013

    NEI: Enriqueciendo los programas educativos de diabetes: Testimonio de una educadora de salud (2:58)
    Este video del Instituto Nacional del Ojo presenta a una educadora de salud hablando sobre su experiencia usando el Kit La diabetes y la salud de los ojos del Programa Nacional de Educación sobre la Salud de los Ojos.

  • September 19, 2013

    The Exposome: New Approaches to the Study of Environment, Behavior, and Health - Dr. Robert Kaplan (26:38)
    Dr. Robert Kaplan of the Office of Behavioral Sciences and Research at the National Institutes of Health discusses the Exposome: New Approaches to the Study of Environment, Behavior, and Health.

  • September 12, 2013

    Cómo se mantiene la boca sana (1:47)
    Este video explica a los niños de 1º y 2º grado qué pueden hacer para prevenir la caries dental.

  • September 12, 2013

    Qué vive adentro de tu boca (1:46)
    Este video, para niños de 1º y 2º grado, explica cómo la bacteria que tenemos en la boca usa el azúcar en los alimentos para producir ácidos, los cuales atacan el esmalte de los dientes y causan caries dental.

  • September 12, 2013

    What Lives Inside Your Mouth? (1:35)
    For children in grades 1 and 2, this video explains how bacteria in our mouths use sugars in food to produce acids that attack tooth enamel and cause tooth decay.

  • September 12, 2013

    Así crecen los dientes (2:38)
    Este video, para niños de 1º y 2º grado, explica por qué los dientes de leche son importantes y cuándo salen los dientes (tanto los de leche como los permanentes).

  • September 12, 2013

    What Keeps Your Mouth Healthy? (1:32)
    This video tells children in grades 1 and 2 what they can do to prevent tooth decay.

  • September 12, 2013

    How Teeth Grow (2:22)
    For children in grades 1 and 2, this video explains why baby teeth are important and when teeth (both baby and adult) come in.

  • August 8, 2013

    Bike To Work Day @ NIH 2013 (23:34)
    The NIH Bicycle Commuter Club's annual Bike to Work Day pit stop at the NIH campus in Bethesda, MD.

  • August 6, 2013

    AARP 2013 Best Employers for Workers Over 50 (4:53)
    NIH was named the best employer for older workers by AARP and the Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM).

  • July 19, 2013

    Interview with Dr. Matthew W. Kelly on Noise and Hearing Loss (6:04)
    6-minute question-and-answer session with an NIDCD scientist on noise and hearing loss.

  • June 19, 2013

    Behavioral Economics and Health: NIH Adherence Network Seminar Series (59:31)
    Behavioral economic approaches merge the fields of economics and psychology and have been used to modify behavior across the spectrum.

  • June 5, 2013

    Minor changes in cardiovascular health reduce chances of stroke (1:59)
    A report, published in Stroke, showed that small improvements in cardiovascular risk factors reduce the chances a person will suffer a stroke.

  • May 23, 2013

    How NIDCD Researcher Matthew W. Kelley, Ph.D., Chose His Research Career Path (1:07)
    In this short video, Matthew W. Kelley, Ph.D., Chief, Developmental Neuroscience Section, NIDCD, NIH, explains how he chose his career as a researcher.

  • May 23, 2013

    What Research Teaches Us about Hearing and Hearing Loss (:57)
    In this short video, Matthew W. Kelley, Ph.D., Chief, Developmental Neuroscience Section, NIDCD, NIH, outlines what his current research tells us about human hearing and hearing loss.

  • May 23, 2013

    Examples of Everyday Sounds That Can Put Us at Risk for Hearing Loss (1:07)
    In this short video, Matthew W. Kelley, Ph.D., Chief, Developmental Neuroscience Section, NIDCD, NIH, explains how loud noises can hurt our hearing.

  • May 23, 2013

    How Can Sounds Hurt Our Hearing? (:41)
    In this short video, Matthew W. Kelley, Ph.D., Chief, Developmental Neuroscience Section, NIDCD, NIH, explains how loud noises can hurt our hearing.

  • May 23, 2013

    How Can We Protect Our Hearing from Loud Sounds? (1:06)
    Developmental Neuroscience Section, NIDCD, NIH, explains how we can protect our hearing from being damaged by loud noise.

  • May 23, 2013

    How Do We Hear Sounds? (1:13)
    In this short video, Matthew W. Kelley, Ph.D., Chief, Developmental Neuroscience Section, NIDCD, NIH, explains how human hearing works

  • May 22, 2013

    Let's Give an Ear to Teenager Sophie Kaye! (5:57)
    Meet Sophie Kaye, a teenager who lost most of her hearing suddenly at age seven.

  • May 22, 2013

    Interview with Lana Shekim, Ph.D., on voice disorders (6:02)
    Interview with Lana Shekim, Ph.D., program director for the NIH/NIDCD Voice and Speech Program, on voice disorders. She explains how voice is produced, why voices differ, careers that raise the risk of voice disorders, how to protect your voice, and NIH/NIDCD research on voice disorders.

  • May 22, 2013

    How Voice Is Produced (:28)
    Lana Shekim, Ph.D., program director for the NIH/NIDCD Voice and Speech Program, uses a diagram to explain how the human voice is produced. Part of a longer interview with Dr. Shekim on voice disorders.

  • May 22, 2013

    Why Voices Vary (1:10)
    Why do human voices vary? Lana Shekim, Ph.D., program director for the NIH/NIDCD Voice and Speech Program, explains the variables that make human voices sound different from one another. Part of a longer interview with Dr. Shekim on voice disorders.

  • May 22, 2013

    How Your Voice Can Be Damaged (:40)
    Human voices can be damaged by illness, injury, overuse, or psychological issues. Lana Shekim, Ph.D., program director for the NIH/NIDCD Voice and Speech Program, explains. Part of a longer interview with Dr. Shekim on voice disorders.

  • May 22, 2013

    Some Careers Can Put Us at Risk for Voice Damage (:58)
    If you have a job that requires extensive use of your voice, you may be at greater risk for voice damage. Lana Shekim, Ph.D., program director for the NIH/NIDCD Voice and Speech Program, lists jobs that may put you at risk. Part of a longer interview with Dr. Shekim on voice disorders.

  • May 22, 2013

    How to Protect Your Voice (1:34)
    Lana Shekim, Ph.D., program director for the NIH/NIDCD Voice and Speech Program, explains how healthy voice habits mirror healthy life habits. Part of a longer interview with Dr. Shekim on voice disorders.

  • May 22, 2013

    NIDCD-Supported Research on Voice Problem (1:09)
    Lana Shekim, Ph.D., Program director for the NIH/NIDCD Voice and Speech Program, explains the range of voice research conducted and supported by the NIDCD and NIH. Part of a longer interview with Dr. Shekim on voice disorders.

  • May 22, 2013

    How Loud Is Too Loud? (:28)
    Explains to children that sound is measured in units called decibels, and demonstrates the decibel level of common sounds. Part of a longer NIDCD video called, "I Love What I Hear!"

  • May 22, 2013

    I Love What I Hear! (7:28)
    Helps children understand how common sounds that are too loud, too close, or too long-lasting can put them at risk for permanent hearing loss. Teaches kids to protect their hearing.

  • May 22, 2013

    Travel Inside the Ear (:37)
    How sound waves travel from your ear to your brain. A short explanation for children, part of a longer NIDCD video called, "I Love What I Hear!"

  • May 22, 2013

    What Is Sound? (:25)
    This short clip explains to children that sound is a form of energy. Part of a longer NIDCD video called, "I Love What I Hear!"

  • May 20, 2013

    Smart and Connected Health: Inter-Agency Program (NSF -- NIH) Webinar (57:43)
    Smart and Connected Health - Inter-Agency Program, National Institutes of Health (NIH Notice Number: NOT-OD-13-041) National Science Foundation (NSF Solicitation: NSF-13-543)

  • May 16, 2013

    NEI Audacious Goals (4:12)
    Overview of the National Eye Institute's Audacious Goals Initiative.

  • April 30, 2013

    NEI: Ask a Scientist — What is Colorblindness? (1:56)
    National Eye Institute video features Dr. Sheldon Miller answering children's questions on colorblindness, whether it can be treated, and how people become color blind.

  • April 30, 2013

    NEI: Ask a Scientist — What is an optical illusion? (1:27)
    National Eye Institute video features Dr. Matt McMahon presenting a fun example and explains how it plays tricks on our eyes.

  • April 30, 2013

    NEI: Ask a Scientist — Why did you become a scientist? (1:29)
    National Eye Institute video features Dr. Pat Becerra discussing why she became a scientist and encourages girls who are interested in science to pursue this interest.

  • April 30, 2013

    NEI: Ask a Scientist — How did you become a scientist? (1:31)
    National Eye Institute video features Dr. Chris Thomas answering children's questions about how you can become a scientist and the variety of jobs they do.

  • April 12, 2013

    National Research Mentoring Network (NRMN) Planning Grant Webinar (52:59)
    The NIH is seeking applications for National Research Mentoring Network (NRMN) Planning Grants. These planning grants are expected to assist institutions in planning their applications for the multi-year NRMN award. This video is an informational webinar about this exciting new funding opportunity.

  • April 5, 2013

    Building Infrastructure Leading to Diversity (BUILD) Planning Grant Webinar (57:17)
    The NIH is seeking applications for Building Infrastructure Leading to Diversity (BUILD) Planning Grants. These planning grants are expected to assist institutions in planning their applications for the multi-year BUILD award. This video is an informational webinar about this exciting new funding opportunity.

  • March 28, 2013

    NIH Director's Broadening Experiences in Science Training (BEST) Award Informational Webinar (1:01:45)
    The NIH is seeking applications for the NIH Director's Broadening Experiences in Scientific Training (BEST) Awards, which aim to enhance training opportunities for early career scientists to prepare them for a variety of career options in the dynamic biomedical workforce landscape. This video is an informational webinar about this exciting new funding opportunity.

  • March 20, 2013

    Panel VI: Overview and Discussion of Main Points and Closing Remarks (1:52:05)
    Gain-of-Function Research on Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza H5N1 Viruses: An International Consultative Workshop.

  • March 20, 2013

    Panel V: Identifying Conditions, if any, under which HPAI H5N1 GOF Research Should be Conducted (2:15:20)
    Gain-of-Function Research on Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza H5N1 Viruses: An International Consultative Workshop.

  • March 20, 2013

    Panel IV: Discussion of HPAI H5N1 GOF Research Case Studies (2:05:35)
    Gain-of-Function Research on Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza H5N1 Viruses: An International Consultative Workshop.

  • March 20, 2013

    Panel III: Perspectives on the Proposed HHS Framework on Funding HPAI H5N1 GOF Research (1:44:00)
    Gain-of-Function Research on Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza H5N1 Viruses:
    An International Consultative Workshop.

  • March 20, 2013

    Panel II: Risks and Concerns Associated with HPAI H5N1 GOF Research (2:03:36)
    Gain-of-Function Research on Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza H5N1 Viruses:
    An International Consultative Workshop.

  • March 20, 2013

    Panel I: HPAI H5N1 GOF Research and Its Implications for Global Public Health (43:01)
    Gain-of-Function Research on Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza H5N1 Viruses:
    An International Consultative Workshop.

  • March 20, 2013

    Gain-of-Funct ion Research on HPAI H5N1 Viruses: Welcome and Introductory Remarks (43:01)
    The presentations in the opening session will set the stage for the Workshop by briefly highlighting the scientific, public health, biosafety, and biosecurity issues surrounding HPAI H5N1 research that increases transmissibility, pathogenicity, and/or host range; introducing the concept that HHS has developed a draft Framework for guiding funding decisions about proposed HPAI H5N1 GOF research; and noting that the meeting participants will have the opportunity to exercise this Framework through discussion of a series of case studies.

  • March 20, 2013

    Dr. Harvey Alter (1:34)
    Dr. Harvey Alter, of the National Institutes of Health's Clinical Center, and two research colleagues recently received the Canada Gairdner International Award for "their critical contributions to the discovery and isolation of the hepatitis C virus, which has led to the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic agents." Dr. Alter describes his groundbreaking research.

  • March 20, 2013

    Dr. Harvey Alter (1:34)
    Dr. Harvey Alter, of the National Institutes of Health's Clinical Center, and two research colleagues recently received the Canada Gairdner International Award for "their critical contributions to the discovery and isolation of the hepatitis C virus, which has led to the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic agents." Dr. Alter describes his groundbreaking research.

  • March 8, 2013

    NIH Management Intern Program (2:50)
    Brief overview of the NIH Management Intern Program (including testimonials from former and current interns).

  • March 1, 2013

    Unlocking the Mysteries of Extracellular RNA Communication (2:10)
    Once thought to exist only inside cells, RNA is now known to travel outside of cells and play a role in newly discovered mechanisms of cell-to-cell communication. Are these extracelluar RNAs (exRNAs) involved in diseases like cancer, heart disease or neurological diseases like Alzheimer's?

  • February 7, 2013

    NEI: Optical Coherence Tomography Scan (:23)
    This National Eye Institute video shows a three-dimensional optical coherence tomography scan of the retina of a man who has diabetes and associated eye disease, taken in the operating room with the Bioptigen SDOCT System (courtesy of Bioptigen, Inc.)

  • February 7, 2013

    NEI: Gaining Perspective on How We See in 3-D (:06)
    This National Eye Institute video demonstrates one of the visual stimuli used in experiments. The moving dots give a powerful sensation of a 3-D cylinder, but you might see it in one of two different ways: with the front surface moving to the left or to the right. Researchers are studying which signals determine the brain state that causes you to see the cylinder move in one direction or the other.

  • February 7, 2013

    NEI: Interview with Robert Fariss, Ph.D.(1:46)
    As chief of the Biological Imaging Core at the National Eye Institute (NEI) Dr. Fariss discusses his passion for cells and microscopes, as well as his experiences since joining the NEI in 2000.

  • February 7, 2013

    NEI: Interview with T. Michael Redmond, Ph.D. (1:25)
    National Eye Institute (NEI) Scientist Dr. Redmond talks about the combination of luck and persistence that drives the scientific process and ultimately leads to medical advances. He describes a hand-me-down project from another NEI group that led his team to discover a crucial protein involved in vision, which served as the basis of groundbreaking gene therapy trial for a blinding eye conditions.

  • February 6, 2013

    NEI: Interview with Manuel Datiles, M.D.(:44)
    This National Eye Institute ophthalmologist Dr. Datiles talks about his collaboration with a physicist from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Their partnership recently resulted in the creation of a new cataract early-detection tool that goes where no space probe has gone before.

  • February 5, 2013

    Una boca saludable para su bebé(6:23)
    Este video es para los padres de bebés o de niños pequeños. Explica por qué los dientes de leche son importantes, da consejos sobre cómo prevenir la caries dental en la infancia temprana y promueve la visita dental de los niños al cumplir un año de edad.

  • February 5, 2013

    A Healthy Mouth for Your Baby (4:23)
    This video is for parents of infants or toddlers. It explains why baby teeth are important, gives tips on how to prevent early childhood tooth decay, and promotes the age 1 dental visit.

  • February 5, 2013

    A Healthy Mouth for Your Baby (for American Indians and Alaska Natives)(4:50)
    This video is for parents of infants or toddlers. It explains why baby teeth are important, gives tips on how to prevent early childhood tooth decay, and promotes the age 1 dental visit. Narrated by Shyanne Beatty, host of the Native radio show "Earthsongs."

  • January 15, 2013

    NIH PROMIS Video (3:13)
    Clinical measures of health outcomes, such as x rays and lab tests, may have little relevance to the day-to-day functioning of patients with chronic diseases. Often, the best way patients can judge the effectiveness of treatments is by changes in their symptoms. This feedback or data is called Patient Reported Outcomes. This video explores the Patient Reported Outcome Measurement Information System (PROMIS), a system built on something called item response theory.

  • January 15, 2013

    NEI: Living With Low Vision: Stories of Hope and Independence (for health professionals) (6:25)
    National Eye Institute video provides an overview of the important role healthcare professionals play in helping patients with low vision maintain their independence.

Videos from NIH: 2012

  • December 12, 2012

    NEI Animation: Leber Congenital Amaurosis (LCA) (0:54)
    This National Eye Institute video looks at the cause and treatment of Leber Congenital Amaurosis (LCA).

  • December 12, 2012

    NEI Animation: Glaucoma (0:42)
    This National Eye Institute video looks at the causes of glaucoma, a group of diseases that damage the eye's optic nerve.

  • December 12, 2012

    NEI Animation: Amblyopia (0:44)
    This National Eye Institute video looks at amblyopia, a condition often referred to as lazy eye.

  • December 12, 2012

    NEI Animation: Diabetic Retinopathy (1:05)
    This National Eye Institute video looks at diabetic retinopathy, the most common eye disease and a leading cause of blindness in people with diabetes.

  • December 12, 2012

    NEI Animation: Cataract (1:21)
    This National Eye Institute video looks at the causes of cataract, a clouding of the lens in the eye that affects vision.

  • December 12, 2012

    NEI Animation: Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD) (0:44)
    This National Eye Institute video looks at the causes of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of visual impairment in older Americans.

  • December 12, 2012

    NIE Animation: Retinopathy of Prematurity (ROP) (0:32)
    This National Eye Institute video looks at retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), a condition that can occur when a baby is born early.

  • December 5, 2012

    DSEIS Delivers (2:20)
    The Division of Scientific Equipment and Instrumentation Services (DSEIS) supports the NIH community by providing prompt, cost-effective, high quality technical equipment services. DSEIS provides laboratory equipment maintenance and repair; computer repair; rental equipment; and new equipment sales.

  • December 5, 2012

    Celebration of Science: Highlights (10:09)
    Forum celebrating the remarkable advances scientists are making to save, extend, and improve lives worldwide, focusing on the health, social, economic, and other benefits of science and for a renewed commitment to advancing biomedical research.

  • November 28, 2012

    We Never Dream Alone (3:12)
    We Never Dream Alone—Dr. Collins.

  • November 28, 2012

    George Beach(9:52)
    George Beach shares how a new biologic treatment gave his artistic career a second act after 25 years of being unable to paint due to joint damage and pain caused by rheumatoid arthritis.

  • November 28, 2012

    Emily Smith (6:21)
    At the age of two, Emily Smith was diagnosed with juvenile arthritis, and she describes the decade that followed as a "roller coaster" in which her arthritis waxed and waned, and her parents and doctors experimented with different dosages of the standard drugs available.

  • November 28, 2012

    Priscilla Ciccariello (8:53)
    Priscilla Ciccariello, who lost her husband, eldest son and a grandson to complications of Marfan syndrome, a connective tissue disorder, describes how new surgeries and other treatment advances have given a more hopeful future to her surviving two sons and the many others living with Marfan syndrome.

  • November 27, 2012

    Alyssa's Story (2:09)
    At the National Institutes of Health and at scientific institutions all over the world, researchers work with patient volunteers to learn more about diseases and conditions, and how to address them.

  • November 27, 2012

    Lydia's Story (2:07)
    At the National Institutes of Health and at scientific institutions all over the world, researchers work with patient volunteers to learn more about diseases and conditions, and how to address them.

  • November 26, 2012

    Dr. Elissa Epel: The Science of Stress (9:12)
    In this edition of The Science of Being Human: Profiles in Behavioral Science series, Dr. Elissa Epel discusses the Science of Stress.

  • November 26, 2012

    Dr. David R. Williams: The Social Factors of Health (6:11)
    In this edition of The Science of Being Human: Profiles in Behavioral Science series, Dr. David R. Williams discusses the Social Factors of Health.

  • November 26, 2012

    Dr. Ana Diez Roux: The Science of Environmental Factors of Health(6:51)
    In this edition of The Science of Being Human: Profiles in Behavioral Science series, Dr. Ana Diez Roux discusses the Science of Environmental Factors of Health.

  • November 26, 2012

    Dr. Gabriella Conti: The Science of Nurturing (8:29)
    In this edition of The Science of Being Human: Profiles in Behavioral Science series, Dr. Gabriella Conti discusses the Science of Nurturing.

  • November 26, 2012

    Dr. David Schwebel: The Science of Child Safety(6:17)
    In this edition of The Science of Being Human: Profiles in Behavioral Science series, Dr. David Schwebel discusses the Science of Child Safety.

  • November 26, 2012

    Dr. Danielle Dick: Candidate Gene Studies (6:24)
    Dr. Danielle Dick of Virginia Commonwealth University discusses the importance of candidate gene studies.

  • November 26, 2012

    Dr. Danielle Dick: VCU Study(3:23)
    Dr. Danielle Dick of Virginia Commonwealth University elaborates on her study regarding alcohol behavioral patterns.

  • November 26, 2012

    Dr. Colleen McBride: GWAS(1:32)
    Dr. Colleen McBride of the National Human Genome Research Institute discusses the importance of GWAS (Genome-Wide Association Studies).

  • November 26, 2012

    Dr. Colleen McBride: Phenotyping(1:11)
    Dr. Colleen McBride of the National Human Genome Research Institute discusses the importance of phenotyping.

  • November 26, 2012

    Dr. Colleen McBride: Role of Behavioral Social Sciences(1:24)
    Dr. Colleen McBride of the National Human Genome Research Institute discusses the role that behavioral and social scientists can play in the area of research.

  • November 26, 2012

    Dr. Colleen McBride: What Excites Me(1:09)
    Dr. Colleen McBride of the National Human Genome Research Institute discuss what excites her about innovations that are being made in genomic research.

  • November 26, 2012

    Dr. Susan Persky: How Genomics Interfaces with Social Sciences(1:17)
    Dr. Susan Persky of the National Human Genome Research Institute discusses how genomics research interface with behavioral and social sciences research.

  • November 26, 2012

    Dr. Susan Persky: How the Research Benefits Health Providers (0:43)
    Dr. Susan Persky of the National Human Genome Research Institute discusses how her research benefits medical providers.

  • November 26, 2012

    Dr. Steve Suomi: Applications on the Human Level(2:50)
    Dr. Steve Suomi of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development discusses how his finings can be used to better understand human social relationships.

  • November 26, 2012

    Dr. Steve Suomi: Breakdown of Research(4:40)
    Dr. Steve Suomi of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development discusses the goals of his research.

  • November 26, 2012

    Dr. Steve Suomi: Gene by Environment(3:59)
    Dr. Steve Suomi of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development elaborates on gene by environment interactions.

  • November 26, 2012

    Dr. Steve Suomi: Genetic and Environmental Connection (3:17)
    Dr. Steve Suomi of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development discusses how his research illustrates the connection between genetic and environmental factors.

  • November 2, 2012

    Going Blind and Going Forward—NEHEP Low Vision Webinar (48:48)
    The National Eye Institute recently held a webinar entitled "Going Blind and Going Forward."

  • October 10, 2012

    Charlene Quinn Spotlight(4:57)
    Dr. Charlene Quinn discusses her research which uses mhealth (or mobile health) to manage diabetes.

  • October 10, 2012

    Brian Wansink Spotlight(5:25)
    Dr. Brian Wansink discusses his research which looks at "mindless eating" or why we eat more than we think.

  • October 5, 2012

    Nina Jablonski Spotlight(6:35)
    Dr. Nina Jablonski discusses her research on the evolution of skin pigmentation.

  • October 5, 2012

    Carl Lejuez Spotlight(5:42)
    Dr. Carl Lejuez discusses his research on risk-taking behavior and substance use.

  • September 21, 2012

    Celebration of Science: Highlights(9:48)
    Forum celebrating the remarkable advances scientists are making to save, extend, and improve lives worldwide, focusing on the health, social, economic, and other benefits of science and for a renewed commitment to advancing biomedical research.

  • September 20, 2012

    Enhancing Eye Health Among Hispanics/Latinos - NEHEP Webinar 2012(49:12)
    The National Eye Institute recently held a webinar entitled "Enhancing Eye Health Among Hispanics/Latinos: A Look At Their Knowledge, Attitudes, And Practices; Results from Nationwide Research."

  • September 20, 2012

    NEHEP Partnership Webinar July 2012(29:47)
    The National Eye Institute recently held a webinar entitled "NEHEP Partnership: When Partners Engage, Great Things Happen."

  • September 19, 2012

    NEI Low Vision Consumer DVD(11:25)
    Millions of Americans lose some of their sight every year. While vision loss can affect anyone at any age, low vision is most common for those over age 65.

  • September 14, 2012

    NEI Diabetic Macular Edema Video Story(3:35)
    Treatment for Diabetic Macular Edema Results in Dramatic Visual Improvement: researchers have shown that ranibizumab eye injections, often in combination with laser treatment, result in better vision than laser treatment alone for diabetes-associated swelling of the retina.

  • September 11, 2012

    NEI Low Vision Profiles: Ruth Lotz(2:47)
    Learn more by watching this profile of a person with vision loss making use of remaining vision and continuing to maintain their independence.

  • September 11, 2012

    NEI Low Vision Profiles: Natina English(3:45)
    Learn more by watching this profile of a person with vision loss making use of remaining vision and continuing to maintain their independence.

  • September 11, 2012

    NEI Low Vision Profiles: Lawrence Harrison(2:38)
    Learn more by watching this profile of a person with vision loss making use of remaining vision and continuing to maintain their independence.

  • September 11, 2012

    NEI Low Vision Profiles: Erin Kerkhoff(3:09)
    Learn more by watching this profile of a person with vision loss making use of remaining vision and continuing to maintain their independence.

  • September 11, 2012

    NEI Low Vision Profiles: Ruth Margolies(3:51)
    Learn more by watching this profile of a person with vision loss making use of remaining vision and continuing to maintain their independence.

  • September 10, 2012

    NEI Low Vision Profiles: Joma Leonard(1:54)
    Learn more by watching this profile of a person with vision loss making use of remaining vision and continuing to maintain their independence.

  • August 31, 2012

    Science Knows No Country(12:13)
    The principal purpose of the film is to show the importance of international collaborative oral health research, and to communicate that NIDCR supports not only U.S. researchers, but also desires to fund the best research anywhere in the world. To illustrate the value of international collaborative research, the video focuses on two institute efforts: a research program in Africa looking at noma, a form of gangrene that attacks the face, and a cleft lip-cleft palate study in the Philippines. "Science Knows No Country" is dedicated to the memory of the late Dr. David Barmes, one of the video's featured researchers, who served as special expert for international health at NIDCR."

  • August 30, 2012

    Scientific Session and Patient Perspective Panel 3: Amye Leong, Healthy Motivation(15:05)
    Amye Leong shares her story of being diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis at age 18—and later with Sjögren's syndrome and osteoporosis—and her journey to become a patient advocate, speaker and author who defies disability. About her role as the international spokesperson for the Bone and Joint Decade, Leong says, "One of things I have been a strong advocate for is the engagement of patients at the research level.

  • July 24, 2012

    Tremors of fur/fur mice at 6 weeks after birth(0:31)
    The onset of the tremor phenotype of fur/fur mice started around 4 weeks after birth. The severe tremors in the hindlimbs were observed when fur/fur mice were walking, but not when they were resting.

  • July 24, 2012

    NEI Diabetes Toolkit(2:16)
    A community health worker talks about her experience using the National Eye Health Education Program's "Diabetes and Healthy Eyes Toolkit."

  • July 13, 2012

    The NIH Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research(4:31)
    A brief video about the NIH Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research and its mission.

  • June 8, 2012

    Rapid Tuberculosis Test(3:56)
    The driving force behind the rapid tuberculosis test that received World Health Organization endorsement is Dr. David Alland, Director of the Center for Emerging & Re-Emerging Pathogens at the New Jersey Medical School. The test uses DNA technology to diagnose tuberculosis in less than two hours...a huge reduction in time-to-results compared to conventional TB diagnosis.

  • June 7, 2012

    BSSR Lecture: Geospatial Methods in Health Research (1:20:43)
    Speaker - Ellen Cromley, PhD, University of Connecticut School of Medicine
    The lecture includes an introduction to global and local spatial statistics, spatial regression models, and models of spatially varying processes. The presentation suggests ways to make health research more spatial and better able to uncover from the vast data available the key configurations of factors that come together in particular places to affect our health.

  • June 7, 2012

    BSSR Lecture Series: Infection, Inflammation, and Cardiovascular Disease among AmerIndians(1:16:25)
    Speaker - Hillard S. Kaplan, PhD
    The basic biology of the human cardiovascular and immune systems, and of glucose and lipid metabolism evolved under conditions of much greater energetic stress and pathogen burden than currently exist in the U.S and other developed countries. This talk focuses on two issues. The first is what can be learned about aging-related diseases by investigating cardiovascular health and disease, inflammation and immunosenescence, and energy metabolism in populations that currently live under conditions of basic subsistence, low energy balance and high pathogen load, without significant access to markets and public health.

  • June 7, 2012

    BSSR Lecture Series: Virtual Patients, Cross-Cultural Research in Four Languages and Adaptive Trials(55:25)
    Speaker - Michael D. Fetters, MD, MPH, MA
    As promotion of high quality living and reduction of human suffering are noble goals of the health sciences, researchers need robust research tools to achieve these ends. Health sciences researchers by necessity investigate a wide variety of phenomena with relevance to basic sciences, biological, clinical, behavioral, epidemiological and philosophical sources. Health sciences researchers have a long tradition of applying rigorous qualitative and quantitative approaches to scientific inquiry. The health sciences thus provide a fertile ground for applying the newly emerging mixed methods paradigm and examining the results of the cross-pollination of qualitative and quantitative methods.

  • June 7, 2012

    BSSR Lecture Series: Positive and Negative Reinforcement Underlying Adolescent Risk-Taking Behavior(1:05:51)
    Carl W. Lejuez, Ph.D., University of Maryland
    This presentation focuses on the use of behavioral measures to understand and model the development of adolescent risk taking behavior. Data are drawn from multiple sources including a 5 year longitudinal study funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) focused on the role of positive reinforcement and a second study funded by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) extending this work to negative reinforcement processes. The presentation will conclude with a consideration of limitations of behavioral assessment approaches as well as future directions aimed at their combination with environmental, genetic, and neurobehavioral assessment.

  • June 7, 2012

    The Matilda White Riley Lecture: Social Isolation and Health(1:23:10)
    Speaker - Cacioppo, John T., National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
    Social species, by definition, form organizations that extend beyond the individual. These structures evolved hand in hand with behavioral, neural, hormonal, cellular, and genetic mechanisms to support them because the consequent social behaviors helped these organisms survive, reproduce, and care for offspring sufficiently long that they too reproduced, thereby ensuring their genetic legacy.

  • June 7, 2012

    BSSR Lecture Series: PTSD Treatment and Prevention(1:11:22)
    Speaker - Barbara O. Rothbaum, Ph.D., ABPP, Emory University School of Medicine
    In the US, approximately 70% of adults will experience a traumatic event and 20% will develop posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Both civilian and combat-related PTSD are major public health concerns with long term medical and mental health sequelae.

  • June 7, 2012

    BSSR lecture Series: Behavioral Economics, Classical Economics, Public Policy, Politics, and Health(1:12:25)
    Speaker - Loewenstein, George, National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
    Behavioral economics has enjoyed an expanding influence on policy, offering novel solutions to problems, including many involving health, that traditional economics, with its assumption of rational choice, often fails to even acknowledge. I will review the rationale for and tools of behavioral economics, in the process discussing several of my own field experiments evaluating novel behavioral interventions in the domain of health. However, I will also raise a variety of issues that need to be confronted for behavioral economics to have a continuing, constructive, influence on policy.

  • June 5, 2012

    A Conversation with Dr. Marshall Nirenberg
    Dr. Marshall Nirenberg, with co-winners Robert W. Holley and Hr Gobind Khorana, was awarded the 1968 Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine in recognition "for their interpretation of the genetic code and its function in protein synthesis."

  • May 31, 2012

    Carl Henn Memorial Bicycle Advocacy Award 2012(15:59)
    The NIH Bicycle Commuter Club presented the first Carl Henn Memorial Bicycle Advocacy Award to Angela Atwood-Moore on Bike to Work Day, May 18 2012.

  • May 25, 2012

    NIH Harmonizes Over Hand Hygiene(04:05)
    The NIH Clinical Center hosted its first Hand Hygiene Awareness Day May 23, 2012, an event centered around educating staff, patients, and visitors about hand sanitation and safety. Well known for his musical talents, NIH Director Dr. Francis Collins organized the debut of a new group for the occasion, the Soap Sud Doo Whoppers. The group included Dr. David Henderson, Dr. Melinda Merchant, Lori Wiener, John Burklow, Carol Levinson, Nicole Plass, and Chauncey Buford.

  • May 24, 2012

    Bike To Work Day NIH 2011(08:49)
    NIH riders checked-in at the NIH Building One Pit Stop for prizes and refreshments on Bike to Work Day, on the morning of May 20, 2011.

  • May 23, 2012

    Bike to Work Day @ NIH, May 18, 2012(08:16)
    NIH Director Dr. Francis Collins and his wife Diane Baker participated in Bike to Work Day festivities at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, MD, on Friday, May 18, 2012. This video includes snapshots of activity at the Building 1 Pit Stop, a brief talk on the health benefits of bicycling by Dr. Collins, and a visit to the Executive Blvd. Pit Stop. For more information, visit the NIH Bicycle Commuter Club website: http://www.recgov.org/r&w/nihbike/index.html. Music: The NIH Jazz Band.

  • May 11, 2012

    BSSR Lecture Series: Regulation of the dopaminergic reward circuit and manic-like behavior(49:36) Speaker-McClung, Colleen A., National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
    Multiple studies have suggested that disruptions in circadian rhythms are central to the development of mood and addiction disorders. However, the mechanisms by which circadian genes regulate mood and reward-related circuitry remains unclear.

  • May 11, 2012

    BSSR Lecture Series: Social Context as Risk Regulator: Extending the Stream of Causation(1:01:32)
    Speaker - Thomas A. Glass, Ph.D.
    Causation is the central problem of health research. Our causal discourse shapes what we study, and how and where we intervene. The potential outcomes model is the most widely accepted causal framework in Epidemiology. However, many "upstream" factors of greatest interest to social scientists are incompatible with this framework. This contributes to a narrow focus on individual-level "down-stream" risk factors and to ineffective interventions that target individuals while ignoring social context.

  • May 11, 2012

    BSSR Lecture Series: Decline Effects/Other Reasons Why We Need an Open Repository(56:34)
    Speaker - Jonathan Schooler
    Why do many published scientific effects appear to diminish with time? This so called "decline effect" has been observed both in individual labs (including my own) and in meta-analyses of findings across research in biology and medicine. Although some scientists dismiss the decline effect as simple statistical self-correction of initially exaggerated outcomes the truth is that we cannot be sure until we have better access to unpublished scientific work. In this talk I will review a variety of explanations for the decline effect including regression to the mean, publication bias, and gradual deterioration in experimental methods with replication.

  • May 11, 2012

    BSSR Lecture: The California Right Care Initiative(1:09:37)
    Speaker - Robert M. Kaplan, PhD
    Efforts to improve the quality of chronic disease care have often failed to improve patient outcomes. Averaged across all practices, patients receive the recommended care only about half the time. In California the performance rates for many standard chronic care quality measures, such as control of high LDL cholesterol or blood pressure, rank substantially below those of other states.

  • May 11, 2012

    BSSR Lecture: Harnessing Systems Science Methodologies To Inform Public Policy(1:57:43)
    Speaker - BSSR Lecture Series
    This symposium will demonstrate how systems science approaches (aka modeling and simulation) can be used to address policy-relevant questions, using childhood obesity as an exemplar. While doing so, it will showcase two mathematical (i.e., System Dynamics) models that are under development as a part of CompMod, the Comparative Modeling for Childhood Obesity Policy Network, which is part of the Envision network of mathematical and statistical modeling teams under NCCOR (the National Collaborative on Childhood Obesity Research).

  • May 10, 2012

    BSSR Lecture: Environments, Inflammation, Transgenerational Perpetuation of Disparities in Health(59:45)
    Speaker - Thomas McDade, PhD
    Inflammation is an important part of human immune defenses against infectious disease, but recent research has implicated dysregulated inflammation in the pathophysiology of a wide range of chronic degenerative diseases, as well as adverse birth outcomes. Current understandings of the links between inflammation and disease are based primarily on research in post- epidemiologic transition populations with high levels of overweight/obesity, and low levels of infectious exposures.

  • May 10, 2012

    Regulating Arterial Blood Pressure
    Dr. Jason Carter, Chair, Department of Kinesiology and Integrative Physiology, Health and Physical Education at Michigan Technological University, is researching how our nervous system reflects the state of our bodies health, and how we can improve it with non-pharmaceutical methods.

  • May 9, 2012

    Blood discovery: JAM-A protein keeps blood clots in check(0:30)
    This Split-screen video shows, at left, the JAM-A protein at work in reducing a blood clot; at right, a blood clot grows unchecked in the absence of the JAM-A protein. The images were taken with an intravital microscope which enables scientists to view and image living cells and systems in real time at very high resolution.

  • April 30, 2012

    Twin Joins TrialNet Diabetes Prevention Trial(03:23)
    A 19-year-old college student takes regular side trips from her campus in Chicago to travel south to Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville for participation in a National Institutes of Health funded anti-CD3 type 1 diabetes prevention trial. Find out why this identical twin decided to take such a big step to further research for the prevention of diabetes.

  • April 23, 2012

    Autism By The Numbers: Prevalence and Diagnosis Criteria Discussed(06:34)
    New numbers from the CDC puts the prevalence of autism at a record high 1 in 88 children. Yale Child Study Center professor James McPartland explains why a wide autism spectrum may explain this surge and how new diagnosis criteria from the American Psychiatric Association, might change the way the disorder is defined.

  • April 16, 2012

    Angela's Story(12:19)
    This is the story of Angela Irizarry, who was born with a life-threatening congenital heart defect, and the groundbreaking surgical technique developed by Yale pediatric surgeon Dr. Christopher Breuer.

  • March 13, 2012

    Birth Defects: The Role of Research(12:52)
    January 2012– Alan E. Guttmacher, M.D., Director, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development http://www.nichd.nih.gov/news/releases/032112-birth-defects.cfm.

  • March 12, 2012

    The Intersection of Science & Security - Panel #3(1:31:32)
    The Intersection of Science and Security: a Case Study Approach. Continuing the global dialogue with the scientific and science policy community with a focus on Asia and the Western Pacific.

  • March 12, 2012

    The Intersection of Science & Security - Panel #2(47:25)
    The Intersection of Science and Security: a Case Study Approach. Continuing the global dialogue with the scientific and science policy community with a focus on Asia and the Western Pacific.

  • March 12, 2012

    The Intersection of Science & Security - Panel #1(1:01:10)
    The Intersection of Science and Security: a Case Study Approach. Continuing the global dialogue with the scientific and science policy community with a focus on Asia and the Western Pacific.

  • March 6, 2012

    Fluid secretion, pancreatic duct(:05)
    The movie is of a sealed intralobular pancreatic duct in primary culture that is stimulated to secrete fluid into the duct lumen, as evident from expansion of the luminal space and enlargement of the duct.

  • March 2, 2012

    Keeping Noise Down On The Farm(03:26)
    Join Noisy Planet on this 3-minute video to Mountain View Farm in Purcellville, Va., to learn about how to protect your hearing if you live or work on a farm. It's not all quiet pastures and peeping baby chicks. In fact, you'll wish you had hearing protection when you hear the pig squeal.

  • February 22, 2012

    Mitochondrial DNA Defects Cause Deafness (04:17)
    A Yale study, funded by the National Institutes of Health, reveals the pathway by which mitochondrial DNA defects cause maternally-inherited deafness. The study may also open the way to learning more about age-related deafness. Gerald Shadel, Ph.D, professor of genetics and pathology at Yale School of Medicine, discusses the findings. The study appears in the journal Cell.

  • February 14, 2012

    2012 Red Dress Fashion Show (06:42)
    In 2012, The Heart Truth marked a decade of commitment to women's heart health. During February's American Heart Month, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) reaffirmed its commitment to increasing awareness about heart disease among women and helping women take steps to reduce their own personal risk of developing heart disease. One of the campaign's signature American Heart Month activities, the Red Dress Collection Fashion Show, serves as a red alert to women that heart disease doesn't care With the generous support of celebrities and the fashion community, the Red Dress took center stage on the runway again this February as the national symbol of women and heart disease awareness.what you wear—it's the #1 killer of women.

  • February 10, 2012

    Glaucoma Webinar (46:29)
    The National Eye Institute recently held a webinar entitled "Eye Health Knowledge and Information Preferences of People at Risk For Glaucoma: Results of Nationwide Focus Groups."

  • February 9, 2012

    Meryl Comer Discusses The Importance of Alzheimer's Research Funding (0:50)
    While attending a press conference where new efforts to fight Alzheimer's disease were announced, Meryl Comer, the president of the Geoffrey Beene Foundation Alzheimer's Initiative, discusses the importance of funding research.

  • February 9, 2012

    Meryl Comer Discusses Alzheimer's Disease (03:17)
    Meryl Comer, the president of the Geoffrey Beene Foundation Alzheimer's Initiative, discussed her personal experience with Alzheimer's disease at a press conference where new efforts to fight Alzheimer's disease were unveiled.

  • February 7, 2012

    National Wear Red Day 2012 - A flash mob thank you from the NIH (04:07)
    February 3, 2012 is National Wear Red Day. To celebrate those who help advance heart disease research and care every day, the National Institutes of Health held a special event.

  • January 31, 2012

    The Economic Cost of Uterine Fibroids (04:44)
    Dr. James Segars, head of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development's Unit on Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility, explains results of the study "The Economic Annual Cost of Uterine Leiomyomata in the United States."

  • January 25, 2012

    NIH Employee Assistance Program (01:20)
    The NIH Employee Assistance Program provides personalized consultation, short-term support, referral and follow up services to enhance personal and professional wellbeing.

  • January 5, 2012

    2011 NIH Early Independence Award Scientists (02:20)
    2011 NIH Early Independence Award Scientists

Videos from NIH: 2011

  • December 20, 2011

    NIH Overview (1:36)

  • December 20, 2011

    Tenure-Track Opportunities at NIH (1:02)

  • December 5, 2011

    Watching Life Develop From a Single Cell (2:30)
    Researchers at Yale University, in collaboration with the NIH and Sloan-Kettering recently developed a new, very powerful imaging technology that allows them to visualize with single cell resolution the development of an organism in its entirety. This technology is 30 times faster than the fastest microscopes that are conventionally used in the field.

  • November 29, 2011

    Francis S. Collins (17:23)
    Calling the NIAMS' 25th anniversary "a chance to reflect on where we have come from," as well as an opportunity "to think about the future," Dr. Francis Collins praises the Institute's leadership for anticipating scientific opportunities, for strong corporate citizenship within the NIH, for tackling diseases that are "common and chronic and costly and crippling," and for supporting "a portfolio of research that has made a real difference in the health of the nation and the health of the world."

  • November 21, 2011

    Dr. Stephen I Katz OUTRO (1:44)
    Dr. Stephen Katz thanks the organizations and presenters who made the NIAMS twenty-fifth anniversary symposium possible, and thanks the audience for attending.

  • November 21, 2011

    Annie Kennedy (12:22)
    Annie Kennedy and Tiffany Schmidt discuss the role of the NIAMS Coalition, a group of more than 70 professional and voluntary organizations concerned with the research of the NIAMS.

  • November 21, 2011

    Panel Discussion 4 (18:23)
    Panel 4 participants take questions from the audience.

  • November 21, 2011

    Maria Morasso (13:05)
    Dr. Maria Morasso describes her research on mouse models of ectodermal dysplasias—a group of skin disorders caused by genetic mutations—to illustrate more generally how basic research can lead to clinical applications. She emphasizes that the end goal in basic research is always the better understanding of a process or pathology with the intention of using that knowledge to improve quality of life. Morasso also emphasizes that science is not done alone, saying that researchers need mentors and they need to work in teams.

  • November 21, 2011

    Cato Laurencin (17:36)
    Dr. Cato Laurencin says that to meet the grand challenges in medicine, we need three things: "bold ideas; bold, smart people; and organizations that believe in us and in funding ideas that are bold." Describing tissue engineering as one of the bold ideas of the 1980s, he says his group is now trying to think in terms of "regenerative engineering," which he describes as "the integration of tissue engineering with advances in material science, stem cells sciences and developmental biology." Laurencin credits the NIAMS with providing ongoing financial support for such engineering, with widening the field, and for having the courage to believe in bold ideas.

  • November 21, 2011

    Helen Lu (17:27)
    Dr. Helen Lu describes the challenge facing the tissue engineer today with an analogy: "How do you connect a rope to a wall without any fixation pins or screws?" Surgeons today use mechanical fixation devices, she explains, but for tissue engineers like herself, Lu says the hope is that in the near future, they can better mimic how ligaments and tendons are naturally connected to the bone. She says her long-term goal, and the goal of others in her field, is to eventually be capable of engineering total joint systems. Lu also talks about the value of having researchers interact with clinicians and the role of mentorship in science, saying, "We stand on the shoulders of giants." She thanks her mentors, including Dr. Cato Laurencin, and her students, as well as her collaborators at the NIAMS intramural research program and at private institutions.

  • November 21, 2011

    Emily Smith (06:12)
    At the age of two, Emily Smith was diagnosed with juvenile arthritis, and she describes the decade that followed as a "roller coaster" in which her arthritis waxed and waned, and her parents and doctors experimented with different dosages of the standard drugs available.

  • November 21, 2011

    Robert Carter 2 (03:03)
    Dr. Robert Carter, Deputy Director of NIAMS, introduces and moderates Scientific Session and Patient Perspective Panel 4.

  • November 21, 2011

    Panel Discussion 3 (19:51)
    Panel 3 participants take questions from the audience

  • November 21, 2011

    Jane Salmon (15:20)
    Dr. Jane Salmon thanks the NIAMS for taking a risk in funding her team's PROMISSE study of lupus patients, despite what she calls its "unconventional" hypothesis.

  • November 21, 2011

    John Stanley (17:04)
    Dr. John Stanley, a professor in the department of dermatology at the University of Pennsylvania, argues that although historically there has been "a long lag between research and improvement in patient care," those lag times are getting shorter, thanks, in large part, to public investment in the research enterprise..

  • November 21, 2011

    Susana Serrate-Sztein (10:21)
    Dr. Susana Serrate-Sztein, Director of the Division of Skin and Rheumatic Diseases, NIAMS, introduces and moderates Scientific Session and Patient Perspective Panel 3.

  • November 21, 2011

    Panel Discussion 2 (20:06)
    Panel 2 participants take questions from the audience.

  • November 21, 2011

    George Beach (09:43)
    George Beach shares how a new biologic treatment gave his artistic career a second act after 25 years of being unable to paint due to joint damage and pain caused by rheumatoid arthritis.

  • November 21, 2011

    John O Shea (14:13)
    Dr. John O'Shea describes the NIH as a place where "people come from around the world and give their heart and soul to tough problems." He recounts his own tough problem, "a bedside to bench to bedside story," which began in 1994, when his team discovered a protein, Jak3, the absence of which causes severe immunodeficiency in humans.

  • November 21, 2011

    Daniel Kastner (16:05)
    Dr. Daniel Kastner recalls "the wonderful opportunities" that the NIH afforded a young scientist and shares some behind-the-scenes stories of his research discoveries.

  • November 21, 2011

    Robert Carter (05:25)
    Dr. Robert Carter, Deputy Director of NIAMS, introduces and moderates Scientific Session and Patient Perspective Panel 2.

  • November 21, 2011

    Panel Discussion (19:05)
    Panel 1 participants take questions from the audience.

  • November 21, 2011

    Priscilla Ciccariello (08:44)
    Priscilla Ciccariello, who lost her husband, eldest son and a grandson to complications of Marfan syndrome, a connective tissue disorder, describes how new surgeries and other treatment advances have given a more hopeful future to her surviving two sons and the many others living with Marfan syndrome.

  • November 21, 2011

    Clifford Rosen (12:43)
    Dr. Clifford Rosen, director of clinical and translational research and senior scientist at the Maine Medical Center Research Institute, gives a "tour" of the recent history of osteoporosis research and the NIH's and the NIAMS' role in sponsoring much of it.

  • November 21, 2011

    Richard Moxley (16:04)
    Dr. Richard Moxley discusses how NIAMS and NIH funding has moved the field of muscular dystrophy research forward via a critical disease registry, a network of research centers, and individual study grants. He discusses the strides being made, particularly in the field of myotonic dystrophy—the most common of the muscular dystrophies—"because of the breakthroughs that we think we are now poised to pursue," including the discovery that toxic ribonucleic acid (RNA) causes the gene defect in myotonic dystrophy and the exciting advances that have been made in treating the disease in animal models.

  • November 21, 2011

    Joan McGowan (03:28)
    Dr. Joan McGowan, Director of the Division of Musculoskeletal Diseases, NIAMS, introduces and moderates Scientific Session and Patient Perspective Panel 1.

  • November 21, 2011

    John Porter (23:49)
    Taking the audience back to the time before "iPads, iPhones, and Twitter," the Honorable John Edward Porter reminds the audience of how the NIAMS has changed the research landscape, saying, "Twenty-five years ago, there was no Pediatric Rheumatology Clinic to diagnose and treat children with arthritis and other rheumatic diseases.

  • November 21, 2011

    Dr Katz (10:53)
    Dr. Stephen Katz thanks the nearly 300 friends of the NIAMS who are present for joining in the day's festivities, emphasizing the role of the NIAMS' many partners that make its work possible, including patients, the public, and the professional and patient groups that make up the NIAMS Coalition.

  • November 7, 2011

    Protein Actin (0:20)
    The protein actin coats individual granules during the final phase of regulated exocytosis in a salivary acinar cell. As exocytosis occurs, the coated granules collapse and disappear from view.

  • November 7, 2011

    Granules in a salivary acinar cell (0:07)
    Granules in a salivary acinar cell fuse singly to the plasma membrane during regulated exocytosis

  • November 4, 2011

    Síntomas de un ataque al corazón (02:07)
    El video de los Síntomas de un ataque al corazón describe los 7 síntomas principales de un ataque al corazón. Con el objetivo de crear un video emotivo que motive a las mujeres a hacerse ver por el médico cuando sienten estos síntomas, el video cuenta las historias personales de varias mujeres que sufrieron un ataque al corazón. Este video es presentado por el Instituto del Corazón, los Pulmones, y la Sangre de los Institutos Nacionales de la Salud.

  • November 4, 2011

    Factores de riesgo para la enfermedad del corazón (2:36)
    El video de Factores de riesgo para la enfermedad del corazón explica los dos tipos de factores de riesgos asociados con el ataque al corazón: los factores que una persona puede controlar y los que no puede controlar. Conocer los factores de riesgo es muy importante ya que teniendo un factor de riesgo duplica la posibilidad de que una persona desarrolle la enfermedad del corazón. Este video es presentado por el Instituto del Corazón, los Pulmones, y la Sangre de los Institutos Nacionales de la Salud.

  • November 2, 2011

    Telework at the NIH (1:23)

  • November 2, 2011

    NIH Job: Program Analyst (0:57)
    Program Analysts at the NIH are responsible for planning, analyzing and evaluating the effectiveness of the operating programs.

  • November 2, 2011

    NIH Job: Nurse (0:57)
    NIH has several opportunities for nurses including a career as a Nurse Consultant or a Clinical Nurse. Nurse Consultants serve as advisors to the Chief Nurse Officer and to other senior-level officials in regard to analyzing nursing program issues and developing patient management plans.

  • November 2, 2011

    NIH Job: Management Analyst (0:54)
    Management Analysts utilize a high degree of qualitative and quantitative analytical skills in analyzing, evaluating, and improving the efficiency of internal administrative operations, organizations, or management. The major duties of this position may include participation in task forces and surveys, studies, and other investigations of areas of management operations to determine adequacy of the present systems.

  • November 2, 2011

    Living in Bethesda (1:22)

  • November 2, 2011

    NIH Job: Budget Analyst (0:57)
    Budget Analysts have a particular interest in financial resources and management at the NIH to ensure that research and other operational activities can be carried out seamlessly and according to regulation and policy. Budget analysts oversee all phases of the budget process which include formulation, presentation, and execution.

  • November 2, 2011

    NIH Job: Biologist (0:53)
    Biologists at the NIH are scientifically challenged daily through exciting life science research. NIH offers opportunities for biologists to gain new skills and techniques in nearly all specialty areas of biomedical research to meet the agency's mission and address national needs.

  • November 2, 2011

    NIH Job: Administrative Officer (0:59)
    Administrative Officers are the link to scientists at the NIH. The efforts of Administrative Officers help scientists perform their research.

  • November 1, 2011

    Common Vision Problems (2:34)
    A doctor explains common vision problems, including nearsightedness, farsightedness, astigmatism, and presbyopia.

  • October 21, 2011

    The NIH Mission - It's About Life (1:50)
    NIH's mission is to seek fundamental knowledge about the nature and behavior of living systems and the application of that knowledge to enhance health, lengthen life, and reduce the burdens of illness and disability.

  • October 21, 2011

    The NIH Campus (1:29)
    The NIH headquarters, known as "NIH campus" to the local community, are located in Bethesda, Maryland, just 10 miles from the center of Washington, D.C. Administrative and program operations facilities are also located in off-campus buildings in the surrounding area.

  • October 21, 2011

    NIH Job: IT Specialist (0:53)
    IT Specialists serve every area of the NIH and enable the business side of the NIH to meet the mission. IT Specialists manage IT security and maintenance issues throughout all of the Institutes, as well as keep up to date with trends and changes in the information technology industry, communicate technical information to customers, and comply with IT legislative requirements.

  • October 18, 2011

    Clinical Research Nurses 2 (1:20)
    Clinical research nurses tell about their pleasure in working with clinical trial participants.

  • October 18, 2011

    Clinical Research Nurses (0:46)
    Clinical research nurses tell about their pleasure in working with clinical trial participants

  • October 5, 2011

    NIH Job: Grants Management Specialist (0:56)
    Grants Management Specialists at the NIH manage funds that are disbursed as grants to universities, small businesses, and other organizations to conduct research.

  • October 5, 2011

    NIH Job: Contract Specialist (0:50)
    Would you like to work for the world's largest buyer and make strategic business decisions on how tax dollars are spent? NIH Contract Specialists manage the full cycle procurement process at the NIH. They purchase and acquire goods and services on behalf of the NIH.

  • October 5, 2011

    NIH Clinical Center celebrates Lasker-Bloomberg Award (1:11)
    The NIH Clinical Center is the 2011 recipient of the Lasker-Bloomberg Public Service Award given by the Albert and Mary Lasker Foundation. The award honors the Clinical Center for serving as a model institution that has transformed scientific advances into innovative therapies and provided high-quality care to patients since 1953. The award also recognizes the Clinical Center's rich history of medical discovery through clinical research.

  • September 29, 2011

    NIH Peer Review Revealed (14:52)
    The NIH Center for Scientific Review created this video for new applicants and others who want to know how the National Institutes of Health evaluates the 80,000+ grant applications it receives each year. With the majority of NIH's $31 billion budget supporting grants to researchers, these reviews are key to future advancements in science and health.

  • September 16, 2011

    What Happens to Your NIH Grant Application Video (22:14)
    Our "What Happens to Your Grant Application" video gives new applicants for NIH grants access to one of our popular outreach presentations. It describes how the NIH Center for Scientific Review handles applications submitted to NIH.

  • September 1, 2011

    NIH Job: Health Scientist Administrator - Scientific Review Officer (0:56)
    Health Scientist Administrator—Scientific Review Officers at the NIH are responsible for the initial review of NIH research grant applications. Some of the duties include organizing and managing peer-review groups to evaluate research proposals on the basis of their scientific merit, and identifying research areas that call for increased or decreased funding emphasis.

  • August 29, 2011

    NIH Job: Health Scientist Administrator - Program Officer (0:59)
    Health Scientist Administrator—Program Officers, while in an administrative function, have direct influence over the science at NIH by identifying research areas that warrant increased or decreased funding emphasis. Program Officers then reach out to the medical research community through workshops and conferences to communicate what research is needed to help meet the mission.

  • August 26, 2011

    NIH Job: Medical Officer (0:51)
    Extramural Medical Officers serve as consultants and clinical investigators in their area of expertise. They use their medical expertise to administer extramural research grants and/or contracts in a major program area

  • August 19, 2011

    The Heart Truth (2:06)
    NHLBI's The Heart Truth campaign video tells the story of the campaign as well as the community events and local programs associated with this initiative. The centerpiece of The Heart Truth is the Red Dress. The Red Dress is a red alert for women to take care of their hearts at all ages.

  • August 19, 2011

    Heart Disease Risk Factors (2:03)
    Heart Attack Risk Factors address the two types of risk factors associated with heart attacks, factors that a person can control and factors they cannot. Knowing the risk factors is so important because having just one risk factor doubles a person's chance of developing heart disease.

  • August 15, 2011

    Heart Attack Warning Symptoms (2:38)
    Heart Attack Warning Symptoms speaks to the 7 main symptoms of a heart attack. It uses real women's stories to personalize the heart attack experience, and encourages women who experience these symptoms to get checked out.

  • August 11, 2011

    Dissemination & Implementation Conference: Day 2 11:15-12:00 (45:29)
    4th Annual NIH Conference on the Science of Dissemination and Implementation: Policy and Practice
    Agenda: Day 2: March 22, 2011
    Policy Dissemination Research: Are We Making Legislation or Sausage?
    Ross C. Brownson, PhD
    Professor of Epidemiology, Washington University in St. Louis

  • August 11, 2011

    Dissemination &Implementation Conference: Day 2 8:30-9:30 (01:02:06)
    4th Annual NIH Conference on the Science of Dissemination and Implementation: Policy and Practice
    Agenda: Day 2: March 22, 2011
    Overview of Dissemination and Implementation Research Opportunities
    David Chambers, DPhil (NIH), Russell E. Glasgow, PhD (NIH), Francis Chesley, MD (AHRQ), David Atkins, MD, MPH (VA)

  • August 11, 2011

    Dissemination & Implementation Conference: Day 1 11:15-12:45 (01:37:22)
    4th Annual NIH Conference on the Science of Dissemination and Implementation: Policy and Practice
    Agenda: Day 1: March 21, 2011
    Invited Panel: International Perspectives on Dissemination and Implementation Research Policy and Practice
    Russell E. Glasgow, PhD (Moderator) National Cancer Institute, NIH.

  • August 11, 2011

    Dissemination & Implementation Conference: Day 1 8:30-9:30 (57:08)
    4th Annual NIH Conference on the Science of Dissemination and Implementation: Policy and Practice
    Agenda: Day 1: March 21, 2011
    Welcome- Helen I. Meissner, ScM, PhD, Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research
    Opening Remarks- Robert Kaplan, PhD , Director, Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research The Implementation Imperative: Closing the Gaps Between Research, Practice and Policy
    Carolyn M. Clancy, MD, Director, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.

  • August 11, 2011

    Dissemination & Implementation Conference: Workshop (02:12:16)
    4th Annual NIH Conference on the Science of Dissemination and Implementation: Policy and Practice
    March 21-22, 2011
    NIH Sponsored Training on
    Impact Evaluation Using Randomized Trials
    In Partnership with Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab

  • July 6, 2011

    The NIH Clinical Center's Guide to Blood Droplet Freezing (6:02)
    The NIH Clinical Center's Guide to Blood Droplet Freezing

  • June 30, 2011

    NICHD's Scientific Vision: The Next Decade (4:31)
    This video features highlights from the scientific visioning process coordinated in 2011 by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), part of the National Institutes of Health.

  • June 27, 2011

    "i on NIH" - June 2011 vodcast (14:12)
    Featured in this month's episode; the winning entry in a video contest about the MedlinePlus, a special high school graduation message from the directLuor of the National Institutes of Health, the first in a series of segments about how the first of the baby boomers are turning 65 this year, and a segment about cataracts.

  • June 22, 2011

    NIH K-12 Lessons About Bioscience Challenge (1:56)
    The trans-NIH Science Education Resource Group announces a new challenge.

  • June 10, 2011

    NIH K-12 Lessons About Bioscience Challenge (1:56)
    The trans-NIH Science Education Resource Group announces a new challenge.

  • May 26, 2011

    Genetic Underpinnings of Alopecia Areata (4:18)
    In alopecia areata, immune system cells attack the rapidly growing cells in hair follicles. This can lead to hair loss on the scalp and elsewhere.

  • May 25, 2011

    The NIAMS 25th Anniversary (3:28)
    In 2011, the NIAMS marked its 25th anniversary with the theme "Improving Lives Through Discovery." Since 1986, the NIAMS has made research advances toward helping people with diseases in the bones, joints, muscles, and skin.

  • May 23, 2011

    Strengthening the Culture of Responsibility with Respect to Dual Use Research and Biosecurity (46:51)
    Bilateral video-teleconference (VTC) entitled Strengthening the Culture of Responsibility with Respect to Dual Use Research and Biosecurity, sponsored by the National Institutes of Health and the Chinese Academy Science and in cooperation with the InterAcademy Panel: The Global Network of Science Academies, the International

  • May 5, 2011

    Multilevel Interventions in Health Care Conference: Conference Closing Remarks (22:20)
    Multilevel Interventions in Health Care: Building the Foundation for Future Research Goals
    At the end of the conference, National Cancer Institute leaders, Drs. Taplin, Klein, and Ballard-Barbash, provide closing thoughts about the conference, future steps in multilevel research, and related projects and efforts in multilevel interventions.

  • May 5, 2011

    Multilevel Interventions in Health Care Conference: Keynote address by Otis Brawley, MD (42:24)
    Multilevel Interventions in Health Care: Building the Foundation for Future Research Goals
    With his background as an oncologist, researcher and administrator, Dr. Otis Brawley (American Cancer Society) brings his unique perspective on multilevel interventions in clinical practice to Saturday's keynote address and consider how health care changes and multilevel interventions.

  • May 5, 2011

    Multilevel Interventions in Health Care Conference: Q&A session moderated by Russell Glasgow, PhD (59:41)
    Multilevel Interventions in Health Care: Building the Foundation for Future Research Goals

    Dr. Glasgow (National Cancer Institute), the moderator for Introduction Papers, entertains questions and comments from conference participants and engages the panel of presenters in discussion of the issues covered in their papers.

  • May 5, 2011

    Multilevel Interventions in Health Care Conference: Presentation by Steven Clauser, PhD (26:41)
    Multilevel Interventions in Health Care: Building the Foundation for Future Research Goals

    Synthesis and Emerging Themes Lead author: Steven Clauser, PhD (National Cancer Institute) This presentation will synthesize emerging themes from the earlier papers and describe key challenges in moving the field of multilevel intervention research forward in cancer care delivery.

  • May 5, 2011

    Multilevel Interventions in Health Care Conference: Discussant comments by Ernest Hawk, MD, MPH (14:37)
    Multilevel Interventions in Health Care: Building the Foundation for Future Research Goals

    Dr. Hawk (MD Anderson Cancer Center), the section discussant, comments on the issues presented from papers by Drs. Warnecke and Khoury on the second day of the conference.

  • May 5, 2011

    Multilevel Interventions in Health Care Conference: Presentation by Muin Khoury, MD, PhD (15:04)
    Multilevel Interventions in Health Care: Building the Foundation for Future Research Goals

    Multilevel Research and the Challenges of Implementing Genomic Medicine Lead author: Muin Khoury, MD, PhD (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)

    Advances in genomics and related fields, promise a new era of personalized medicine in the cancer care continuum. Nevertheless, there are fundamental challenges in integrating genomics into current cancer practice.

  • May 5, 2011

    Multilevel Interventions in Health Care Conference: Presentation by Richard Warnecke, PhD (13:15)
    Multilevel Interventions in Health Care: Building the Foundation for Future Research Goals

    Linking Multilevel Approaches to Issues in Health Policy Lead author: Richard Warnecke, PhD (University of Illinois at Chicago)

    As health care reform is being considered and advanced, solutions being proposed for the delivery of health care begin with addressing access issues by reducing financial barriers. This paper uses breast cancer as a marker of health care delivery and analyzes how the view from communities facing health disparities provides insights for policy.

  • May 5, 2011

    Multilevel Interventions in Health Care Conference: Discussant comments by Martin Charns, DBA (16:03)
    Multilevel Interventions in Health Care: Building the Foundation for Future Research Goals

    Dr. Charns (Boston University; United States Department of Veterans Affairs), the section discussant, comments on the issues presented from papers by Drs. Devers and Yano on the second day of the conference.

  • May 5, 2011

    Multilevel Interventions in Health Care Conference: Presentation by Elizabeth Yano, PhD (13:16)
    Multilevel Interventions in Health Care: Building the Foundation for Future Research Goals

    Implementation and Spread of Multilevel Interventions in Practice: Implications for the Cancer Care Continuum Lead author: Elizabeth Yano, PhD (United States Department of Veterans Affairs; University of California, Los Angeles)

  • May 5, 2011

    Multilevel Interventions in Health Care Conference: Presentation by Kelly Devers, PhD (18:01)
    Multilevel Interventions in Health Care: Building the Foundation for Future Research Goals

    Healthcare Reform and Multilevel Interventions and Research: Big Changes Go Hand in Hand with Big Science Lead author: Kelly Devers, PhD (Urban Institute)

  • May 5, 2011

    Multilevel Interventions in Health Care Conference: Recap of Day 1 by Arnold Kaluzny, PhD (13:27)
    Multilevel Interventions in Health Care: Building the Foundation for Future Research Goals

    Arnold Kaluzny, PhD (University of North Carolina) welcomes participants to the second day of the Multilevel Interventions in Health Care Conference, sponsored by the National Cancer Institute. He summarizes the first day's events.

  • May 5, 2011

    Multilevel Interventions in Health Care Conference: Keynote address by W. Richard Scott, PhD (37:19)
    Multilevel Interventions in Health Care: Building the Foundation for Future Research Goals

    Dr. Richard Scott's (Stanford University) keynote address on the first day of the conference presents conceptual issues and the opportunities for multilevel research.

  • May 5, 2011

    Multilevel Interventions in Health Care Conference: Q&A session moderated by Ellen Gritz, PhD (31:51)
    Multilevel Interventions in Health Care: Building the Foundation for Future Research Goals

    Dr. Gritz (University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center), the moderator for Section II Papers, entertains questions and comments from conference participants and engages the panel of presenters in discussion of the issues covered in their papers.

  • May 5, 2011

    Multilevel Interventions in Health Care Conference: Discussant comments by Brian Mittman, PhD (12:31)
    Multilevel Interventions in Health Care: Building the Foundation for Future Research Goals

    Dr. Mittman (United States Department of Veterans Affairs), the section discussant, comments on the issues presented from papers by Drs. Morrissey and Charns on the first day of the conference.

  • May 5, 2011

    Multilevel Interventions in Health Care Conference: Presentation by Martin Charns, DBA (16:33)
    Multilevel Interventions in Health Care: Building the Foundation for Future Research Goals

    Multilevel Interventions: Measurement and Measures Lead author: Martin Charns, DBA (Boston University; United States Department of Veterans Affairs)

    The purpose of this paper is to explore the issues/opportunities related to measurement when planning, developing, and implementing multilevel interventions across the cancer care continuum. Specifically, the paper will discuss ways to think about measurement when operating in a multi-phase (i.e., cancer care continuum), multilevel (e.g., patient, provider, delivery environment) service (i.e., cancer care, health care) delivery environment.

  • May 5, 2011

    Multilevel Interventions in Health Care Conference: Presentation by Joseph Morrissey, PhD (13:54)
    Multilevel Interventions in Health Care: Building the Foundation for Future Research Goals

    Computer Simulation Models and Multilevel Cancer Control Interventions Lead author: Joseph Morrissey, PhD (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)

    This paper will examine how models can be used to simulate the effects of multilevel intervention components and the role of mediating and moderating factors on outcomes.

  • May 5, 2011

    Multilevel Interventions in Health Care Conference: Discussant comments by Thomas Vogt, MD, MPH (10:28)
    Multilevel Interventions in Health Care: Building the Foundation for Future Research Goals

    Dr. Vogt, the section discussant, comments on the issues presented from papers by Drs. Weiner, Alexander, and Cleary on the first day of the conference.

  • May 5, 2011

    Multilevel Interventions in Health Care Conference: Presentation by Paul Cleary, PhD (10:22)
    Multilevel Interventions in Health Care: Building the Foundation for Future Research Goals

    Multilevel Interventions: Study Design and Analysis Issues Lead author: Paul Cleary, PhD (Yale University)

    This paper will discuss approaches to studying multilevel interventions across the cancer care continuum, and in other therapeutic areas.

  • May 5, 2011

    Multilevel Interventions in Health Care Conference: Presentation by Jeff Alexander, PhD (08:10)
    Multilevel Interventions in Health Care: Building the Foundation for Future Research Goals

    Time Issues in Multi-level Interventions for Cancer Treatment and Prevention Lead author: Jeff Alexander, PhD (University of Michigan)

    This paper will explore how time (and timing) introduces important complexities in the design of multilevel interventions and in modeling behavior and expected results of such interventions. The paper will address: a) time as a level embedded within individual patients; b) temporal aspects of intervention implementation, fidelity, and sustainability; c) analytic techniques for incorporating time in models of multilevel interventions, and d) costs and benefits of incorporating time in evaluations of multilevel interventions.

  • May 5, 2011

    Multilevel Interventions in Health Care Conference: Presentation by Brian Weiner, PhD (11:33)
    Multilevel Interventions in Health Care: Building the Foundation for Future Research Goals

    In Search of Synergy: Strategies for Combining Interventions at Multiple Levels Lead author: Brian Weiner, PhD (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)

    The social ecological perspective provides a compelling justification for multilevel intervention. Yet it offers little guidance for selecting interventions that work together in complementarity or synergistic ways. Using a causal modeling framework, we describe five strategies for increasing potential complementary or synergy among interventions that operate at different levels of influence.

  • May 5, 2011

    Multilevel Interventions in Health Care Conference: Q&A session moderated by Rena Pasick, DrPH (30:46)
    Multilevel Interventions in Health Care: Building the Foundation for Future Research Goals

    Dr. Pasick (University of California, San Francisco), the moderator for Introduction Papers, entertains questions and comments from conference participants and engages the panel of presenters in discussion of the issues covered in their papers.

  • May 5, 2011

    Multilevel Interventions in Health Care Conference: Discussant comments by Maria Fernandez, PhD (12:22)
    Multilevel Interventions in Health Care: Building the Foundation for Future Research Goals

    Dr. Fernandez (University of Texas), the section discussant, comments on the issues presented from papers by Drs. Taplin, Zapka, and Stange on the first day of the conference.

  • May 5, 2011

    Multilevel Interventions in Health Care Conference: Presentation by Kurt Stange, MD, PhD (10:59)
    Multilevel Interventions in Health Care: Building the Foundation for Future Research Goals

    State-of-the-Art and Future Directions in Multilevel Interventions Across the Cancer Control Continuum Lead author: Kurt Stange, MD, PhD (Case Western Reserve University)

    This paper will describe the current state of multilevel cancer control intervention research, characterize how multilevel research currently is conceptualized and implemented, and identify opportunities to advance cancer control through multilevel research.

  • May 5, 2011

    Multilevel Interventions in Health Care Conference: Presentation by Jane Zapka, ScD (10:08)
    Multilevel Factors Impacting Quality: Examples from the Cancer Care Continuum Lead author: Jane Zapka, ScD (Medical University of South Carolina)

    The purpose of this paper is to use case scenarios representing two types of care (screening and survivorship) to: a) illustrate the variability, diversity, and interaction of factors from multiple levels that impact the quality of care delivery across the cancer continuum; and b) discuss implications for research and provide examples of multilevel interventions.

  • May 5, 2011

    Multilevel Interventions in Health Care Conference: Introduction by Stephen Taplin, MD, MPH (18:02)
    Multilevel Interventions in Health Care: Building the Foundation for Future Research Goals

    Introduction: Understanding and Influencing Multilevel Factors Across the Cancer Continuum Lead author: Stephen Taplin, MD, MPH (National Cancer Institute) This overview paper will provide frameworks and definitions to lay the groundwork for subsequent articles on multilevel interventions and research on the cancer care continuum.

  • May 5, 2011

    Multilevel Interventions in Health Care Conference: Overview by Arnold Kaluzny, PhD (13:10)
    Multilevel Interventions in Health Care: Building the Foundation for Future Research Goals

    Arnold Kaluzny, PhD (University of North Carolina), provides an overview of the Multilevel Interventions in Health Care Conference. He is introduced by Steven Clauser, PhD (National Cancer Institute).

  • April 27, 2011

    African American Men and Oral Cancer (3:10)
    African American men are one of the groups at highest risk for oral cancer - but many don't know it. Watch this video to learn more about oral cancer and the importance of detecting the disease early when it can be treated more successfully.

  • April 20, 2011

    Multilevel Interventions in Health Care Conference: Welcome by Steven Clauser, PhD (6:07)
    Multilevel Interventions in Health Care: Building the Foundation for Future Research Goals

    Steven Clauser, PhD (NCI), welcomes participants to the first day of the Multilevel Interventions in Health Care Conference, sponsored by the National Cancer Institute.

  • April 12, 2011

    NIH Artificial Heart Valve (3:46)
    The DeWitt Stetten Medical Museum participated in a AAAS Webinar aired on April 1, 2011. The Stetten Museum showed and explained the early use of heart valve surgery at the National Institutes of Health.

  • April 6, 2011

    Strategic Plan for NIH Obesity Research (4:18)
    Dr. Francis Collins, director of the National Institutes of Health, talks about the importance of obesity research and the Strategic Plan for NIH Obesity Research.

  • March 29, 2011

    "i on NIH" - April 2011 vodcast (21:16)
    Featured in this month's episode are segments about a spina bifida study, the Heart Truth, and dry eye.

  • March 17, 2011

    Cataract (2:35)
    A doctor explains cataract and how to prevent and treat the condition.

  • February 10, 2011

    Management of Myelomeningocele Study (MOMS) (4:35)
    Spina bifida is an open spinal cord, and myelomeningocele is he most severe form of spina bifida. Dr. Catherine Spong of the National Institute of Child Health and Health Development discusses the result of a trial undertaken to evaluate whether or not prenatal surgery for spina bifida was beneficial compared to the standard postnatal repair.

  • February 5, 2011

    Recovery of photographs after a water emergency (1:03)
    This video describes techniques for salvaging small color snapshots that have been wet for a short time before the surface has become mushy, moldy or damaged.

  • January 21, 2011

    Liver-2 (0:13)
    Vascular flow (Cascade Blue Dextran, blue) in the liver of a transgenic mouse expressing soluble GFP (Hepatocytes, green) and membrane-targeted Tomato (Cellular membranes, red). Imaging performed by intravital confocal microscopy.

  • January 21, 2011

    Migration (0:12)
    Macrophages migrating in a tumor implanted in the back of an immunocompromised mouse and imaged by intravital two-photon microscopy. The tissue is labeled by injection of Hoechst (cyan) to label the nuclei.

  • January 21, 2011

    Endocytosis-3 (0:30)
    Trafficking of dextrans in the endosomal compartment in the Salivary glands of live rats. In red Texas Red-Dextran accumulated in lysosomes. In green internalization and endosomal fusion of Alexa-488 Dextran.

  • January 21, 2011

    Liver (0:10)
    Vascular flow in the liver of a live rat imaged by using intra-vital microscopy. In red, Texas-Red Dextran, in cyan the hepatocytes revealed by endogenous fluorescence.

  • January 21, 2011

    Endocytosis-1 (0:17)
    Systemic injection of 70 KDa Texas Red-Dextran and 500 KDa FITC-Dextran in a live rat. Texas Red-dextran internalization in the stromal cells of the Salivary Glands is imaged using intravital two-photon microscopy.

  • January 21, 2011

    The Heart Truth (12:18)
    To warn us about our number one killer and inspire us to take action against it, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute—NHLBI—created the "Heart Truth," a national awareness campaign for women about heart disease.

  • January 12, 2011

    Age-Related Macular Degeneration (2:05)
    A doctor explains age-related macular degeneration.

  • January 4, 2011

    Glaucoma (2:16)
    A doctor explains glaucoma, and how to treat the condition.

  • January 3, 2011

    Severe Asthma Research at the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (6:18)
    This presentation discusses research aimed at developing new treatments for patients with severe asthma being conducted at the National Institutes of Health's National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.

  • January 3, 2011

    Diabetic Eye Disease (2:09)
    A doctor explains diabetic eye disease, and how to treat the condition.

Videos from NIH: 2010

  • December 14, 2010

    Dry Eye (1:38)
    A doctor explains dry eye and how to treat the condition.

  • November 29, 2010

    AIDSinfo—Top 10 in 2010 (6:20)
    In observance of World AIDS Day 2010, AIDSinfo is pleased to announce the premier of a video highlighting AIDSinfo services entitled "AIDSinfo — Top 10 in 2010." AIDSinfo is your source for federally approved HIV treatment and research information.

  • November 26, 2010

    NIAMS and the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) (3:50)
    The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) resulted in an infusion of funds for NIH research, and provided the NIAMS with significant opportunities to impact research related to conditions of the bones, joints, muscles, and skin.

  • November 22, 2010

    NIH Summer Employment Program (0:30)
    Summer employees discuss the NIH Summer Employment Program

  • November 22, 2010

    Applying to the NIH Summer Internship Program (14:45)
    Dr. Sharon Milgram, the director of the NIH Office of Intramural Training and Education, discusses how to apply for the NIH Summer Internship Program.

  • November 15, 2010

    Key Enzyme Gene Variations Linked to Prostate Cancer (6:26)
    Recently, researchers at the National Institutes of Health reported that variations in a gene for an enzyme involved in cell energy metabolism appear to increase the risk for prostate cancer. The genetic variations all impair the enzyme phosphodiesterase 11A (PDE11A), which helps regulate a cell's responses to hormones and other signals. Previous studies by this group have linked genetic variations that inactivate PDE11A with increased susceptibility to testicular cancer and adrenal tumors. In a new Web video, the study's senior author, Constantine Stratakis, M.D., D.Sc., acting director of the Intramural Research program at the NICHD, discusses the study's findings

  • October 25, 2010

    Movement of epithelial cells in developing gland (0:21)
    Dr. Jeff Chi-feng Hsu of the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research discusses a method he devised to watch the movement of epithelial cells in the developing gland labeled with green fluorescent protein

  • October 25, 2010

    Overview of gland (0:30)
    Dr. Jeff Chi-feng Hsu of the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research devised a method to watch the movement of epithelial cells in the developing gland labeled with green fluorescent protein. Using a red dye to identify spaces between cells, he could directly follow how the clefts formed. Here is a time lapse video of the cleft process in the salivary gland and the branching of new tissue.

  • October 20, 2010

    The NIH Common Fund, To Boldly Go Where No Robot Has Gone Before (6:55)
    To Boldly Go Where No Robot Has Gone Before: An Interview with Dr. Chris Austin, Director, NIH Chemical Genomics Center, Molecular Libraries Program

  • October 18, 2010

    Los Chicos del Cohete (3:28)
    Vean como la juventud y la ciencia pueden hacer florecer la ciencia en esta historia verídica de dos jovencitos que iniciaron exitosamente un proyecto científico gracias a una beca obtenida de los Institutos Nacionales de Salud (NIH) en 1957.

  • October 18, 2010

    The Rocket Boys of NIH (3:32)
    See how kids and science can soar in this true story of two kids launched into a scientific adventure after getting a "grant" from the National Institutes of Health in 1957.

  • October 7, 2010

    Vision Process Overview (5:01)
    Throughout the coming year, the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) will collaborate with its many stakeholders to identify the most promising scientific opportunities of the next decade across the breadth of the Institute's mission. The aim of this process is to develop a scientific Vision that sets an ambitious agenda and inspires the NICHD, its many partners, and the research community to achieve critical scientific goals and meet pressing public health needs.

  • October 6, 2010

    Dilated Eye Exam (2:19)
    Dr. Rachel Bishop of the National Eye Institute discusses the importance of having a dilated eye exam.

  • October 5, 2010

    Filtration of a fluorescent dye through the kidney of a live rat (0:12)
    Filtration of a fluorescent dye through the kidney of a live rat imaged by using intra-vital microscopy. In red, a fluorescent dye that flows first through the distal and then to the proximal tubuli (both highlighted in green). The movie is played at 50X the real speed.

  • October 5, 2010

    Vascular flow close to a lymph node in a live mouse harboring a metastatic tumor (0:08)
    Vascular flow close to a lymph node in a live mouse harboring a metastatic tumor imaged by using intra-vital microscopy. Red blood cells and leucocytes are shown in black. In green, two tumoral cells in the process of entering the vasculature. The movie is played at 25X the real speed.

  • October 5, 2010

    Cross section of a large vein in a live mouse (0:07)
    Cross section of a large vein in a live mouse imaged by using intra-vital microscopy. Circulating blood cells flowing through the vessel are shown in black. The movie is played at 9X the real speed.

  • September 17, 2010

    NIH and NASA collaborate on International Space Station (4:22)
    The NIH and NASA have a strong history of collaboration and share many interests in the life and health sciences. The two agencies recently partnered to conduct biomedical experiments that astronauts could perform on the International Space Station (ISS).

  • September 16, 2010

    ADHD: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (4:11)
    Researchers from the National Institute of Mental Health, part of the National Institutes of Health, talk about the symptoms of ADHD as well as the latest research.

  • September 8, 2010

    The NIH Osteoarthritis Initiative (3:06)
    The NIH Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI) focuses on the most common form of osteoarthritis, knee OA. A public repository was developed that is used by scientists throughout the world to further the development of osteoarthritis drugs and to improve public health.

  • September 8, 2010

    NIAMS Information Dissemination and Outreach (1:55)
    An important part of the NIAMS mission is to support the dissemination of information on research progress related to arthritis and musculoskeletal and skin diseases.

  • September 8, 2010

    Genetic Risk Factor for Rheumatoid Arthritis and Lupus (2:26)
    A longtime collaborative research program has identified a genetic variation that increases the risk of two autoimmune diseases: rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and systemic lupus erythematosus, or lupus.

  • September 8, 2010

    The DIRA Discovery (3:49)
    NIAMS researchers recently discovered a new autoinflammatory syndrome - deficiency of the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (DIRA), through innovative and collaborative efforts with an international team of investigators.

  • September 8, 2010

    The NIAMS Coalition (2:25)
    The NIAMS Coalition plays a vital role as a liaison among the researchers that NIAMS funds, the patients who benefit from the Institute's research investments, Congress and the general public.

  • September 8, 2010

    NIAMS Career Development and Training (1:45)
    NIAMS is dedicated to training a new generation of scientists to solve the health problems within the Institute's research mandate. We actively seek candidates at all stages in their careers who want to learn the latest advances in basic and clinical research

  • September 8, 2010

    Bone Mass in Children and Adolescents (1:50)
    A recent study funded by NIAMS sheds light on the development of bone mass in children and adolescents. It suggests that bone mass may actually peak earlier than is currently believed.

  • September 8, 2010

    Biomedical Research on the International Space Station (2:54)
    NIH is working closely with NASA to facilitate biomedical research in space for better understanding of human health on earth.

  • September 8, 2010

    The APPLE Trial (2:40)
    Learn about the Atherosclerosis Prevention in Pediatric Lupus Erythematosus, or APPLE Trial—a collaborative effort between NIAMS and the Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatology Research Alliance (CARRA) to study the effects of a common cholesterol drug against artery fat buildup in children with lupus

  • September 2, 2010

    Dr. Howard Nash (18:03)
    The Howard Nash Symposium, Recognizing 40 years of Contributions to Genetics Research, NIH Symposium August 9, 2010

  • August 26, 2010

    The NIH Common Fund's Human Microbiome Project (6:11)
    No Longer Germ Warfare. An interview with Dr. Julie Segre, NIH Intramural Researcher, The NIH Common Fund's Human Microbiome Project.

  • August 9, 2010

    The Heart Truth ® (La verdad acerca del corazón) (Spanish language with Spanish captions) (11:51)
    La enfermedad del carazón es la causa principal de muerte entre las mujeres en los Estados Unidos, incluso entre las hispanas. Una de cada cuatro mujeres muere por la enfermedad del corazón. Con el fin de alterarnos sobre esta grave amenaza para la salud, el Instituto Nacional de Carozón, loas Pulmones y la Sangre (NHLBI por sus siglas en ingles) ha creado él vestido rojo como el simbolo nacional de la campana para concientizarnos sobre la enfernedad del corazón en las mujeres. El vestido rojo es el elemento central de la campana nacional de NHLBI. La verdad acerca del corazón, conocida en ingles como The Heart Truth.

  • August 9, 2010

    The Heart Truth ® (La verdad acerca del corazón) (Spanish language with English captions).f4v (11:52)
    Heart disease is the number one killer of women in the United States, even among Hispanics. One out of every four women dies of heart disease. To alert women to this serious health threat, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) has chosen the red dress as the national symbol for women and heart disease awareness.

  • June 30, 2010

    Translational Research and Vision (5:56)
    National Eye Institute 40th Anniversary, Translational Research and Vision, Francis Collins, M.D., Ph.D, Director, National Institutes of Health

  • June 16, 2010

    NIH Tips for Applicants (4:38)
    NIH Tips for Applicants: Reviewers and staff at the National Institutes of Health offer their insights to scientists seeking to improve their chances of getting a grant from the National Institutes of Health.

  • June 14, 2010

    NIH Tips for Applicants (4:38)
    NIH Tips for Applicants: Reviewers and staff at the National Institutes of Health offer their insights to scientists seeking to improve their chances of getting a grant from the National Institutes of Health.

  • June 4, 2010

    Retinopathy of Prematurity (3:18)
    Scientists have shown that through an eye exam, doctors can identify infants who are most likely to benefit from early treatment for a potentially blinding eye condition called retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), resulting in better vision for many children.

  • June 2, 2010

    National Institutes of Health: BIKE TO WORK DAY (5:12)
    Dr. Francis S. Collins, Director of the National Institutes of Health, addresses NIH employees during "Bike to Work Day."

  • May 19, 2010

    Updates on Therapies for Hairy Cell Leukemia (28:48)
    Dr. Robert Kreitman, chief of the Clinical Immunotherapy Section, Laboratory of Molecular Biology at the National Cancer Institute, provides an update on therapies for hairy cell leukemia at an NIH Clinical Center Grands Rounds lecture.

  • May 12, 2010

    Smokefree Women video contest (2:47)
    Smokefree Women is launching a video contest - Celebrating Smokefree Voices. The Smokefree Women's Team want to capture the variety of quitting experiences and reasons for quitting smoking among women and friends/family across the nation.

  • May 12, 2010

    Dual Use Research: A Dialogue (7:40)
    Dual Use Research: A Dialogue This educational video was produced by the National Institutes of Health (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services) to raise awareness and understanding about the issue of dual use life sciences research. The video offers a conceptual introduction to the issue and features interviews with some of the country's leading experts who discuss the need to ensure scientific progress while ensuring appropriate oversight. The target audience includes life scientists, trainees and students, research administrators, and the general public.

  • May 7, 2010

    Link Between Child Care and Academic Achievement and Behavior (3:48)
    Teens who were in high-quality child care settings as young children scored slightly higher on measures of academic and cognitive achievement and were slightly less likely to report acting-out behaviors than peers who were in lower-quality child care arrangements during their early years, according to the latest analysis of a long-running study funded by the National Institutes of Health

  • May 6, 2010

    Higher Oxygen Levels Improve Preterm Survival (5:56)
    New findings from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development show that higher oxygen levels improve very preterm infants' survival but increase the risk for a condition that can damage the retina.

  • April 22, 2010

    Women Are Researchers (24:19)
    This program looks at three women who overcame gender, ethnic, and physical barriers to become successful biomedical researchers. They serve as inspirational role models and offer advice or preparing for a career in scientific research.

  • March 31, 2010

    Life Works: Veterinarian (2:07)
    Tanya Burkholder, a veterinarian at the National Institutes of Health, discusses her job.

  • March 31, 2010

    Life Works: Recreational Therapist (2:06)
    Mary Carson discusses the importance of recreational therapy and her typical day.

  • March 31, 2010

    Life Works: Registered Nurse (1:56)
    Kelly Richards, a research nurse at the National Institutes of Health who is also a member of the Public Health Service, discusses his typical day and specific protocols his team is working on.

  • March 31, 2010

    Life Works: Emergency Medical Technician (2:07)
    Darryl Lowery, an emergency medical technician with the NIH fire department, discusses his typical work day.

  • March 31, 2010

    Life Works: Ophthalmologist (1:54)
    Dr. Emily Chew, an ophthalmologist at the National Eye Institute, discusses research she is conducting on age-related macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy, two of the leading causes of blindness. She also talks about her typical work day.

  • March 24, 2010

    Women Are Surgeons (25:54)
    This program takes a close up look at the lives of three women surgeons, including an operating room during real-life trauma, heart surgery, and orthopedic surgery.

  • March 24, 2010

    Women Are Pathologists (29:47)
    The first part of this program features the fictional story of a teenage girl who learns first-hand about the field of pathology as she tries to resolve a family crisis. The second part of the program features three omen who are real-life pathologists working in forensic pathology, surgical pathology, and academic pathology

  • March 23, 2010

    Women Scientists with Disabilities (23:09)
    This program looks at three women scientists who have triumphed over their own challenges to achieve astounding success in their fields.

  • March 23, 2010

    Women in Dental Research (25:23)
    This video looks at three researchers who have contributed to the field of dental research. This segment looks at a community of scientists who banded together to fight an epidemic, how molecular research helps researchers understand the mysteries of oral disease and cancer, and how one scientist has made groundbreaking discoveries about the link between oral health and premature births.

  • March 18, 2010

    Angie Christensen: Forensic Anthropologist (1:48)
    Dr. Angie Christensen, a forensic anthropologist at the FBI laboratory, describes what her work entails.

  • March 18, 2010

    Vivian Morales: Medical Technologist (1:41)
    Vivian Morales, a medical technologist with the National Institute of Health's Clinical Center, describes what her work entails.

  • March 18, 2010

    Peter Bandettini: Biophysicist (1:45)
    Dr. Peter Bandettini, a Biophysicist at the National Institutes of Health, describes what his work entails.

  • March 18, 2010

    Keisha Hines-Harris: Biological Technician(2:07)
    Kiesha Hines-Harris, a biological technician at the National Institutes of Health, describes what her work entails.

  • February 24, 2010

    NIH, on the Inside: Gambling Addiction (7:26)
    This episode of "NIH, on the Inside," explores gambling addiction and research being conducted at the National Institutes of Health to understand why teenagers are more likely to take risks.

  • January 22, 2010

    The Science of Simulating Disease Spread (7:41)
    National Institute of General Medical Sciences' program director Irene Eckstrand shares her excitement about the visual and ethical benefits and computer models, the advantage of computer modeling for infectious disease spread, and the future of information integration in computer models.

  • January 12, 2010

    "i on NIH" - January 2010 vodcast (18:50)
    Featured in this month's episode are segments about the tropical disease schistosomiasis, family history's link to type 2 diabetes, and the NIH news update.

  • January 12, 2010

    Schistosomiasis - i on NIH - episode #0024, segment 1 (6:00)
    According to the World Health Organization, at least 200 million people worldwide have the tropical disease schistomiasis and more than 700 million live in endemic areas. This segment looks at a unique resource that is helping investigators learn more about schistomiasis and devise potential ways to end it.

  • January 9, 2010

    Questions to ask about diabetes - i on NIH - episode #0024, segment 2 (04:53)
    In the second of a two-part interview, Dr. Griffin Rodgers, director of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, discusses the risk factors for diabetes as well as a condition called pre-diabetes.

  • January 8, 2010

    NIH research Update - i on NIH - episode #0024, segment 3 (5:11)
    Harrison Wein, Ph.D., discusses a study that indicates that teen fitness may be linked to higher ID and achievement and a study that shows that depriving yourself of certain foods may lead you to overeat.

Videos from NIH: 2009

  • December 2, 2009

    2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Congenital Heart Defects (3:28)
    Congenital heart defects are the most common type of birth defect, affecting eight out of every 1,000 newborns. The frequency of recurrences in the same families strongly suggests there are genetic contributions.

  • November 12, 2009

    2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Dr. John W. Lawler (2:35)
    Dr. John W. Lawler, a professor of pathology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, Massachusetts, discusses the impact that the 2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act has had on his laboratory work on the thrombospondins (a family of extracellar matrix proteins).

  • November 1, 2009

    2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Dr. Jay Vaidya (1:20)
    Dr. Jay Vaidya of the Johns Hopkins University discusses the impact that the 2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act has had on his research on arterial disease.

  • October 29, 2009

    "i on NIH" - October 2009 vodcast (22:13)
    Featured in this month's episode are segments about a 2009 H1N1 influenza update and a discussion about targeted drug delivery.

  • October 23, 2009

    2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: MIT (1:22)
    Researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology discuss how the 2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act is helping them develop new technologies for repairing dysfunctional heart muscle tissue.

  • October 23, 2009

    2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Dr. Pamela Zeitlin (1:14)
    Dr. Pamela Zeitlin, a professor of pediatrics at the Johns Hopkins Children's Center at the Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland, discusses the impact that the 2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act has had on her research directed at finding an alternative gene as a treatment target for cystic fibrosis.

  • October 23, 2009

    2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Dr. Clay Marsh (0:59)
    Dr. Clay Marsh, a senior associate vice president for Health Sciences Research at the Ohio State University, discusses the how the 2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act has accelerated the time it takes to take a discovery from the laboratory to a patient's bedside.

  • October 23, 2009

    2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Dr. Kerry Stewart (1:30)
    Dr. Kerry Stewart, professor of Medicine at Johns Hopkins where he directs the clinical and research exercise physiology programs, discusses how the 2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act has provided him with the opportunity to hire additional staff to study the overweight and obesity problem in the U.S

  • October 23, 2009

    2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Lung Cohort Sequencing Project (2:06)
    Researchers at the University of Washington discuss the impact that the 2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act will have on the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's Lung Cohort Sequencing Project, a new effort to discover variation in the human genome that influences both acute and chronic diseases.

  • October 22, 2009

    2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Northwest Genomics Center (2:27)
    Researchers in the Department of Genome Sciences at the University of Washington School of Medicine discuss the impact of the 2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act in the establishment of the new Northwest Genomics Center.

  • October 16, 2009

    NIH Research Update - i on NIH—episode #0023, segment 3 (5:22)
    Harrison Wein, Ph.D., discusses three stories related to sleep and circadian rhythm. One is about a gene that regulates sleep length, the second is about sleep and Alzheimer's disease, and the three is about eating when you should be sleeping.

  • October 9, 2009

    2009 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine (1:43)
    Dr. Jeremy Berg, the director of the National Institute of General Medical Sciences at the National Institutes of Health, discusses the 2009 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine that was awarded for the discovery of telomeres and telomerase.

  • October 9, 2009

    2009 Nobel Prize in Chemistry (2:56)
    Dr. Jeremy Berg, the director of the National Institute of General Medical Sciences at the National Institutes of Health, discusses the 2009 Nobel Prize in Chemistry that was awarded for the determination of the high-resolution structure of the ribosome.

  • October 3, 2009

    2009 H1N1 Influenza update (10:01)
    In an interview conducted on September 15, 2009, Dr. Anthony Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, provided an update of 2009 H1N1 influenza.

  • September 22, 2009

    Modeling the metabolic network of Thermotoga maritima (1:53)
    In the first achievement of it kind, researchers have modeled the structures of every protein involved in Thermotoga maritima, the slowest-evolving bacteria known. Understanding how proteins work in this ancient bacterium could clear up some murky areas in our evolutionary past and teach us more about similar networks in many other animals.

  • September 22, 2009

    Leading Cells with Light (0:57)
    A new light based approach turns on a protein that helps human cancer cells move

  • September 22, 2009

    Findings Videocast - Dr. Omalola Eniola-Adefeso (4:40)
    Dr. Omalola Eniola-Adefeso, a professor of Chemical Engineering at the University of Michigan, discusses the development of a way to deliver drugs right to the part of the body where they're needed to fight infection or disease.

  • September 4, 2009

    Depression (3:51)
    Depression is a serious medial illness; it's not something that you have made up in your head. It's more than just feeling "down in the dumps" or "blue" for a few days. It's feeling "down" and "low" and "helpless" for weeks at a time.

  • August 27, 2009

    NIH Research Update - i on NIH—episode #0022, segment 4 (3:27)
    Updates on a depression gene that may not add to risk after all and scientists pinpoint the cells that give you a light touch.

  • August 27, 2009

    Questions to ask about diabetes - i on NIH - episode #0022, segment 3 (5:59)
    Dr. Griffin Rodgers, director of the National Institute on Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, discusses type 2 diabetes

  • August 27, 2009

    NLM's African Malaria tutorial - i on NIH- episode #0022, segment 2 (9:34)
    In part two of a two part interview Julia Royall further discusses the National LIbrary of Medicine's African malaria tutorial and additional planned tutorials.

  • August 27, 2009

    HBO's Alzheimer's Project - i on NIH - episode #0022, segment 1 (9:10)
    The National Institute on Aging recently collaborated with HBO Documentary Films for THE ALZHEIMER'S PROJECT, a multi-platform public health series which takes a look at groundbreaking scientific discoveries and seeks to bring a wider understanding of Alzheimer's disease research and care

  • June 16, 2009

    NIH Research Update - i on NIH - episode #0021, segment 4 (4:06)
    Updates on a new study that shows reveals that our skin is home to a much wider array of bacteria than previously thought and a study that shows that acupuncture and acupuncture-like treatments both improved chronic low back pain.

  • June 16, 2009

    Exercise, Sleep, and Cancer Risk - i on NIH - episode #0021, segment 3 (3:40)
    A study of women examined the link between exercise and cancer risk, paying special attention to whether or not getting adequate sleep further affects the risk of developing cancer.

  • June 16, 2009

    Sudden Cardiac Arrest - in on NIH- episode #0021, segment 2 (3:57)
    Former NFL star and Olympic track and field gold medalist,, Willie Gault, discusses sudden cardiac arrest. Gault is the founder of Athletes for Life, a non-profit organization with a mission to detect and prevent sudden cardiac death.

  • June 16, 2009

    NLM's African malaria tutorial - i on NIH—episode #0021, segment 1 (9:37)
    Julia Royall, chief on international programs, discusses the National Library of Medicine's interactive African malaria tutorial.

  • May 21, 2009

    H1N1 Influenza A virus (4:59)
    Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, discusses the H1N1 influenza A virus.

  • May 18, 2009

    Eye on NEI (1:45)
    A compilation of interviews focusing on Erik Weihenmayer, the only blind man to summit Mount Everest, recounting his experiences with testing a breakthrough vision device known as BrainPort.

  • May 18, 2009

    NEI Interview with Mike Oberdorfer (0:58)
    Michael D. Oberdorfer, Ph.D. at the National Eye Institute explains a new treatment for blindness.

  • May 18, 2009

    NEI Interview with Erik Weihenmayer (2:16)
    Erik Weihenmayer, the only blind man to summit Mount Everest, recounts his experiences with testing a breakthrough vision device known as BrainPort

  • May 18, 2009

    NEI Interview with Bob Beckman (1:42)
    Robert A. Beckman, President and CEO of Wicab, Inc. shares details of how sensory information can be substituted for people who have lost their vision. A device delivers visual information to the tongue.

  • May 14, 2009

    Nanotechnology (1:11)
    Nanotechnology is defined as the understanding and control of matter at dimensions of roughly 1 to 100 nanometers, a scale at which unique properties of materials emerge that can be used to develop novel technologies and products.

  • May 1, 2009

    NIH Research Update - i on NIH -episode #0020, segment 4 (5:09)
    Harrison Wein, Ph.D., discusses the latest research findings from NIH, including a study about fat that could help keep the weight off and what's occupying children with autism.

  • May 1, 2009

    Monitoring the Future Survey - i on NIH - episode #0020, segment 2 (6:29)
    High school senior Lillian Rosen talks to the Director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse, Dr. Nora Volkow, about the latest findings from the most recent annual survey of teen drug abuse - the Monitoring the Future survey.

  • May 1, 2009

    Healthy Vision - i on NIH - episode #0020, segment 1 (6:30)
    May is Healthy Vision Month. Dr. Janine Austin Clayton, an ophthalmologist and deputy director of NIH's Office of Research on Women's Health, discusses the importance of regular eye exams.

  • May 1, 2009

    Neural Tube Defects - i on NIH - episode #0020, segment 3 (3:11)
    A recent study shows that children born to women who have low blood levels of vitamin B-12 shortly before and after conception, may have an increased risk for a neural tube defect.

  • March 31, 2009

    NIH Research Update—i on NIH—episode #0019, segment 4 (5:56)
    No description available.

  • March 31, 2009

    Convergence Insufficiency—i on NIH—episode #0019, segment 3 (4:04)
    NIH-funded researchers have found a more effective treatment for a common childhood eye problem, called convergence insufficiency—or CI.

  • March 31, 2009

    Immature Progenitor Cells—i on NIH—episode #0019, segment 2 (4:05)
    Immature progenitor cells have the unique ability to build brain tissue from a single cell. NIH researchers have discovered how to get these cells in a line, light them up and, using a computer-driven system, split them out.

  • March 31, 2009

    Physical Activity Guidelines—i on NIH—episode #0019, segment 1 (4:22)
    According to the new Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans, adults gain substantial health benefits from from two and a half hours a week of moderate aerobic physical activity, and children benefit from an hour or more of physical activity.

  • March 19, 2009

    NIH Research Update—i on NIH—episode #0018, segment 3 (4:37)
    No description available.

  • March 19, 2009

    Bipolar disorder i on NIH—episode #0018, segment 2 (5:26)
    An in-depth interview with an expert from the National Institute of Mental Health about bipolar disorder.

  • March 19, 2009

    NIH-OXCAM Scholarship Program—i on NIH—episode #0018, segment 1 (7:23)
    The NIH-OXCAM Scholarship Program is an innovative training path for exceptional students in biomedical and research doctoral training.

Videos from NIH: 2008

This page last reviewed on October 21, 2014

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