*** This page is archived and provided for reference purposes only ***

Skip Over Navigation Links

NIH Research Matters

April 2007 Archive

April 2, 2007

Photo of two blue blobs next to each other in an elliptical green cell.

New Insight into Mechanism of Aging

Researchers believe they've discovered how a rare genetic defect causes premature aging. The process they uncovered may play a role in the normal aging process as well.

Photo of a baby girl.

Assisted Reproductive Technologies Don't Affect Genetic Code

Technologies to help women become pregnant have been growing in popularity ever since the birth in 1978 of the first successful "test-tube baby," which was conceived by in vitro fertilization. Many people, however, still worry that assisted reproduction technologies may carry health risks. A new study in mice can partly set their minds at ease. It found that the technologies had no detectable effects on the genetic code.

A row of one blue and two orange panels, with a mouse touching the blue panel.

Genetically Altered Mice See a More Colorful World

By giving mice the gene that allows people to see red hues, scientists have created rodents that can see a wider range of colors. The study offers clues to the evolution of color vision and suggests that the brains of mammals can quickly adapt to new sensory information.

april 16, 2007

Photo of female patient getting a mammogram.

Computers Don't Help Mammogram Analysis

An increasingly used computer software system designed to help doctors spot evidence of breast cancer instead appears to reduce the accuracy of mammogram readings and may lead to additional and unnecessary medical testing, according to a recent study.

Doctor consulting with patient

MRI Increases Detection of Second Cancer in Opposite Breast

When a woman is newly diagnosed with cancer in one breast, there’s up to a 10% chance that clinical exams and mammography will miss a tumor growing in the opposite breast. In light of this, some women opt for a prophylactic double mastectomy. Others choose to keep their breast but live with the chance of developing a second cancer. A new study funded by NIH's National Cancer Institute (NCI) provides welcome news to women faced with this decision. It found that magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) improved the detection of cancer in the opposite breast at the time of initial diagnosis.

Photo of two dogs running toward camera, the one on the right towering over the one on the left.

Researchers Identify Gene Involved in Dog Size

An international team has identified a genetic variant that influences how big a dog can get.

april 23, 2007

Silhouette of rhesus macaque on a background of the letters A, C, T, and G, which represent the chemical components of the genome.

Monkey Genome Gives New Insight Into What Makes Us Human

The sequencing of the human genome in 2001 was a momentous accomplishment. However, to understand what separates us genetically from our less evolved relatives, researchers need to have the genome sequences of other primates for comparison. An international team of more than 170 scientists has now sequenced the genome of the rhesus macaque monkey and compared it to both the chimpanzee and human genomes. Their analysis reveals that the three primate species share about 93% of their DNA.

Photo of female scientist using pipette to transfer liquid samples to small containers in a tray.

Lab-on-a-Chip Spots Potential Disease in Saliva

Preliminary findings from a large clinical trial expand the potential use for Gleevec, one of a new class of cancer drugs specifically designed to block abnormal proteins that lead to tumor growth. After surgical removal of a rare type of gastrointestinal tumor, patients who took daily Gleevec tablets were significantly less likely to have the cancer return than patients who didn't take the drug. The results were announced because the study had met its main goal of boosting survival without cancer recurrence.

Photo of Gleevec tablets next to pharmaceutical bottle.

Gleevec Helps Prevent Return of Type of Gastrointestinal Tumor

Preliminary findings from a large clinical trial expand the potential use for Gleevec, one of a new class of cancer drugs specifically designed to block abnormal proteins that lead to tumor growth. After surgical removal of a rare type of gastrointestinal tumor, patients who took daily Gleevec tablets were significantly less likely to have the cancer return than patients who didn't take the drug. The results were announced because the study had met its main goal of boosting survival without cancer recurrence.

april 30, 2007

Image of a broken helix spiraling up from a mouse's head.

Study Links Faulty DNA Repair to Huntington's Disease

Huntington's disease, an inherited neurodegenerative disorder that affects roughly 30,000 Americans, is incurable and fatal. But a new discovery about how cells repair their DNA points to a possible way to stop or slow the onset of the disease.

Photo of a salt shaker and spilled salt.

Lower Sodium Decreases Long-Term Risk for Cardiovascular Disease

Lowering your salt intake not only prevents high blood pressure but can also prevent heart disease, according to new clinical trial data.

Photo an older woman.

Breast Cancer Rates Drop with Less Hormone Replacement Therapy

Scientists have found a rare genetic mutation that, while appearing in only one-third of 1% of schizophrenia patients, may hold clues to improved treatments.

Contact Us

E-mail: nihresearchmatters@od.nih.gov

Mailing Address:
NIH Research Matters
Bldg. 31, Rm. 5B64A, MSC 2094
Bethesda, MD 20892-2094

About NIH Research Matters

Editor: Harrison Wein, Ph.D.
Assistant Editors: Vicki Contie, Carol Torgan, Ph.D.

NIH Research Matters is a weekly update of NIH research highlights from the Office of Communications and Public Liaison, Office of the Director, National Institutes of Health.

ISSN 2375-9593

Box Header Goes Here

Box Content Goes Here

This page last reviewed on April 9, 2013

Social Media Links

*** This page is archived and provided for reference purposes only ***