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The NIH Almanac

Recent Photos from the National Center for Research Resources (NCRR)

2011 Photos

Photo of the AMIGO surgical suite. NCRR provided $2.5 million to the National Center for Image-Guided Therapy at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School to develop the AMIGO, a one-of-a-kind surgical suite combining real-time imaging of X-ray fluoroscopy and ultrasound with CT, MRI and PET. (Photo courtesy of Junichi Tokuda, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School.)
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Image of immunologist Louis Picker. Immunologist Louis Picker is developing a new vaccine strategy for HIV that uses a benign, yet ever-present virus called cytomegalovirus (CMV) to carry HIV's unique proteins. To develop his vaccine, Picker works in the rhesus monkey model of HIV at the NCRR-funded Oregon National Primate Research Center at Oregon Health & Science University, where he is head of the Division of Pathobiology and Immunology and serves as professor and associate director of the university's Vaccine and Gene Therapy Institute. (Photo courtesy of the Oregon Health & Science University. Design by Palladian Partners, Inc.)
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Photo of John Postlethwait. John Postlethwait and his team are screening thousands of drug candidates for activity to rescue mutations that cause Fanconi anemia (FA), a rare genetic blood disease. With NCRR support, they have developed a model system in zebrafish that are mutated for the zebrafish copies of the human genes for FA and exhibits symptoms that parallel those found in humans with the disease. (Photo by Amanda Rapp.)
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Photo of Elena Batrakova.CDDN researcher Elena Batrakova uses macrophages to deliver nanozymes that destroy inflammation-causing free radicals behind the blood-brain barrier in mice. The Parkinson's disease model holds promise for the human disorder as well as other neurodegenerative diseases. (Photo courtesy of the University of Nebraska Medical Center.)
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Photo of Paul Tchounwou.Paul Tchounwou and his team at Jackson State University's Center for Environmental Health, funded by NCRR's Research Centers in Minority Institutions program, are studying the effects of arsenic trioxide on leukemia cells. With NCRR support, they may have found a unique way to improve arsenic trioxide's activity in cancer treatment, potentially leading to a novel therapy for some leukemia patients. (Photo courtesy of Jackson State University.)
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Photo of microbiologist Jonathan Stiles.RCMI-funded Morehouse School of Medicine microbiologist Jonathan Stiles focuses his research on neglected diseases. His research has taken him to Ghana to study cerebral malaria — a particularly severe form of a mosquito-borne disease — leading him to ground-breaking research that may change the way malaria is diagnosed in the future. (Photo/Kreativ Touch, Morehouse School of Medicine.)
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2010 Photos

Photo of of Mytilus edulis. With pilot funding from the Northwestern University Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute, supported through the CTSA program, researchers studied sticky proteins produced by the foot of the common mussel (Mytilus edulis). Northwestern University researcher Phillip Messersmith developed synthetic materials mimicking these proteins that can stick to different surfaces even in wet environments. Messersmith tested these mussel-based "glues" to repair tears that occur in amniotic sacs, a complication of some pregnancies. (Photo courtesy of Northwestern University.)
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Photo of a phone displaying ImageVis3D. The ImageVis3D Mobile visualization program — free to download via the Apple iTunes store — allows anyone to view realistic, high-resolution 3-D pictures of medical image data. Scientists and doctors now can observe patients' CAT scans, MRIs, ultra-sounds, electron microscopy and other data in 3-D right from their phones. (Photo courtesy of the Scientific Computing and Imaging Institute, University of Utah.)
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Photo of Qi-Long Ying. A research team led by Qi-Long Ying at the University of Southern California demonstrated that a gene-targeting mutation in rat embryonic stem cells can be transmitted through the germline to produce rats with the same mutation, providing a powerful new approach for creating models to study gene function relevant to human diseases. Photo courtesy of Qi-Long Ying, assistant professor of cell and neurobiology at the Keck School of Medicine of USC.
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Photo of Dr. Rebecca Johnson.With both a residency in anesthesiology and a Ph.D., Rebecca Johnson divides her time between clinical work and research at the University of Wisconsin–Madison School of Veterinary Medicine. In the clinic, Johnson serves as the anesthesiologist for all types of animals, from domestic cats to tigers. Photo courtesy of the University of Wisconsin–Madison.
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2009 Photos

a photo of Dr. Nasser Altorki viewing CT scans on a lightbox. Architect Nannette Rodriguez (left) and builder Mark Crudup discuss plans for a new facility at the University of Puerto Rico. Behind them is an artist's rendition of the building — the first in Puerto Rico to be designed exclusively to support research. NCRR supported the building's construction with Extramural Research Facilities Improvement grants. Professor Loyda Meléndez (right) and other university colleagues will use the new facility to conduct research in such areas as neuroscience, cancer and molecular studies. (Artist rendition courtesy of the University of Puerto Rico; portraits by Paco Márquez.)
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a photo of two rhesus macaques. Sandy Yoder, MT, senior research specialist, works in Vanderbilt University Medical Center's Pediatric Infectious Diseases Lab. She uses liquid nitrogen to keep vials at 220 degrees below zero. Yoder is putting away influenza samples obtained in vaccine trials at Vanderbilt. (Photo by Neil Brake, courtesy of Vanderbilt University Medical Center.)
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a photo of a man looking through a MRI system. A prototype helmet bears 90 overlapping coils that pick up an MRI signal. The helmet, designed by NCRR-supported researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital, defied scientific dogma to make more powerful brain scans possible. (Lawrence Wald and Graham Wiggins, Massachusetts General Hospital.)
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a photo of Dr. Qian Chen. Science Education Partnership Awards provide two to five years of grant support to stimulate scientific curiosity and encourage hands-on science education activities among students in kindergarten through 12th grade. (Photo courtesy of Palladian Partners, Inc.)
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2008 Photos

a photo of a child in a hospital bed talking to a doctor. Dr. Nasser Altorki, director of the Division of Thoracic Surgery at New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center, confers with a colleague about a CT scan of a patient's chest. Weill Cornell Medical College became a member of the Clinical and Translational Science Awards (CTSA) consortium in October 2009. The CTSA Program—led by NCRR—is designed to speed discoveries from the laboratory to clinical practice. (Photo courtesy of Weill Cornell Medical College)
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a microscopic image of fluorescent green cells. Researchers at the NCRR-supported Yerkes National Primate Research Center introduced—for the first time ever—a gene for a human disease into a primate. The result is an animal model that shows disease progression and symptoms characteristic of human Huntington's disease, which may make it possible to test new therapies for human patients. Here, cells isolated from the monkeys glow because they express a jellyfish gene for green fluorescent protein, which signals the successful transfer of the human disease gene. (Photo by Dr. Anthony Chan/Yerkes National Primate Research Center)
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2007 Photos

a photo of Dr. Nasser Altorki viewing CT scans on a lightbox. Dr. Nasser Altorki, director of the Division of Thoracic Surgery at New York-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center, confers with a colleague about a CT scan of a patient's chest. Weill Cornell Medical College became a member of the Clinical and Translational Science Awards (CTSA) consortium in October 2007. The CTSA Program-led by NCRR-is designed to speed discoveries from the laboratory to clinical practice. (Photo courtesy of Weill Cornell Medical College)
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a photo of two rhesus macaques. The sequencing of the rhesus macaque genome-funded by NIH's National Human Genome Research Institute-was performed at the Baylor College of Medicine Human Genome Sequencing Center in Houston, Texas; the Genome Sequencing Center at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri; and the J. Craig Venter Institute in Rockville, Maryland. This effort was supported by several NCRR-funded National Primate Research Centers. (Photo by Randall C. Kyes / University of Washington)
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a photo of a man looking through a MRI system. Nashville's Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science received a $2 million High-End Instrumentation (HEI) grant from NCRR to support the purchase of a 7-tesla human magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy system. It provides the highest magnetic imaging available for humans and is one of only several such instruments in the country. (Photo by Dana Johnson, courtesy of Vanderbilt University Medical Center)
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a photo of Dr. Qian Chen. Physicians, scientists, and engineers at Rhode Island Hospital and The Warren Albert Medical School of Brown University are establishing a multidisciplinary Center of Biomedical Research Excellence in Skeletal Health and Repair to develop treatment strategies for bone and joint diseases such as osteoarthritis. The Center is funded by NCRR's Institutional Development (IDeA) Program, which builds capacity in underserved states. Pictured is Dr. Qian Chen, director of the Center at Rhode Island Hospital. (Photo courtesy of Lifespan/Robin Dunn Blossom)
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This page last reviewed on January 23, 2013

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